Appalachia Gardening

Sow True Seed Cucumber Reporting @ Large Update

Blind pig and the acorn cucumber reporters at large sponsored by sow true seed

 

I finally manged to get my Sow True Seed Reporting @ Large Cucumber varieties planted. At the end of a long tiring day Chitter helped me plant:

Slicing Cucumber Muncher: I’ve never grown this variety before. I typically grow cucumbers that stay on the smaller size because I think they taste better, but the description states that this one won’t get bitter even at the longer lengths that it grows-so I’m anxious to see how it turns out.

Richmond Green Apple: I have grown this one before – it’s an excellent producer for us. The roundish cucumbers have a milder flavor and the skin seems thinner to me.

Marketmore 76: This one is described as one of the best all around cucumbers – even good for selling at the market. I’ve never grown it before either.

Boston: According to the description, this is the cucumber for pickling. I’m excited about growing it for the first time because I put up lots of pickles each summer.

Bush Pickle: I grow this one every year. It is a great producer and it does take up way less space than cucumber varieties that run.

Suyo Long: These babies can grow up to 18 inches long!!! I was excited about trying them for their size alone, but somehow I didn’t mange to keep any of the seed. I’ll be anxious to see how they do for the Blind Pig and The Acorn Cucumber Reporters @ Large.

If you signed on to be a Cucumber Reporter @ Large send me an update when you get a chance and I’ll share your report with everyone. I’ve only gotten one so far so I’m anxious to see how everyone else is faring.

Tipper

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9 Comments

  • Reply
    Melissa P (misplaced Southerner)
    May 19, 2016 at 11:47 am

    Anita G, No, a UP thimbleberry is like a tiny red raspberry with a zillion (maybe a slight exaggeration) seeds/pips. The pips are soft so you just eat them with the berry. I read that they are also called salmonberry or snow bramble. They do make some delicious jam. There are monks in the Keweenaw Peninsula that make some wonderful jam with them.

  • Reply
    anita griffith
    May 18, 2016 at 12:40 pm

    Melisa P. We have a blackberry here in E.KY.my dad always called a thimbleberry,It’s not as common as the regular blackberry.It’s thimble shaped,more shade tolerant,and more sour until it’s dead ripe.The last time I checked on my favorite patch it had died out.They were growing in semi-shade on sandy soil.Does this sound like the same berry you have in U.P.?
    LG

  • Reply
    anita griffith
    May 18, 2016 at 12:08 pm

    I’ve grown the bush,Boston pickler,and the market 76. The market 76 produced but it blighted.Never heard of the rest.Maybe I can get on the seed list sometime.The deer and groundhogs really love my garden.Last year I had to get rid of 7 groundhogs.They are more of a problem than the deer.
    LG

  • Reply
    Ken Roper
    May 18, 2016 at 11:41 am

    Tipper,
    I just heard The Wilsons, Ray and Pap (The Wilson Brothers), and my favorite…Chitter and Chatter singing “the River of Jordan.”
    A lot of folks request songs of our Local People’s singing at our Radio Station. It’s good to live here…Ken

  • Reply
    Ken Roper
    May 18, 2016 at 11:35 am

    Tipper,
    I just heard The Wilsons, Ray and Pap (The Wilson Brothers), and my favorite…Chitter and Chatter singing “the River of Jordan.”
    A lot of folks request songs of our Local People’s singing at our Radio Station. It’s good to live here…Ken

  • Reply
    Ken Roper
    May 18, 2016 at 10:57 am

    Tipper,
    I never knew there were so many different kinds of cucumbers. Those you brought me a few years ago really stopped my acid reflux problems, I’d just turn-up the pint jar and take a swig of the juice. I keep it in the frig cause I like it cold, but I’d never had any like that since then, cause those were peeled.
    Those folks in Stecoah are in for a real treat this Saturday. I can’t wait till they come to our town the 29th of May…Ken

  • Reply
    Miss Cindy
    May 18, 2016 at 9:35 am

    Oh Tip, those cucumbers are going to be soooo good and I am soooo glad I live close to you now soooo I can help you eat them!
    I was shopping the other day and saw a rack of vegetable seeds called Sow Right, I think that was it’s name. Anyway I thought Sow True has become a company to reckoned with if they are now being copied.
    GO SOW TRUE!!!

  • Reply
    Barbara Gantt
    May 18, 2016 at 8:22 am

    I have some beautiful plants that I started indoors under lights. They are now out in the hoop house. I hope to be able to plant them in the garden this weekend. We had snow flurries this week. I will then plant some seeds in the ground to see how they will grow. Hoping for a big crop of cukes. Barbara

  • Reply
    Melissa P (misplaced Southerner)
    May 18, 2016 at 8:15 am

    I do so love hearing about your garden and all you grow!
    Here in the great north woods, I’m limited to finding berry brambles (usually black raspberry). In the UP (Upper Peninsula) a delicious – but exceedingly seedy – berry called a thimbleberry grows wild. Luckily the seeds are very small and soft so they don’t act like common pips. Lucky for me, there are many local farmers who don’t live in the woods who grow some amazing produce and we are able to get fresh fruits and vegetables – starting about mid-July – at the Farmers’ Markets.

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