Appalachia Gardening

Planting By The Signs April 2019

April-2019-Planting-Calendar

We have tomatoes, peppers, and a few melons growing in the greenhouse. And we have onions, radishes, beets, and lettuce growing in the garden. I feel like we’re farther along than we usually are this time of the year and I’m glad for it.

I told you about my silly plum tree that blooms way to early several weeks back. As usually several hard frosts put an end to any hope of plums. We planted a cherry tree the same year we planted the plum. It’s never bloomed until this year. There aren’t many blooms, but hopefully the few that are there means I’ll have a least a cherry or two for the first time ever this year.

Over the weekend we managed to get Granny’s garden whipped into shape. Drop back by tomorrow and I’ll tell you about it.

Tipper

Appalachian Cooking Class details

Come cook with me!

MOUNTAIN FLAVORS – TRADITIONAL APPALACHIAN COOKING
Location: John C. Campbell Folk School – Brasstown, NC
Date: Sunday, June 23 – Saturday, June 29, 2019
Instructors: Carolyn Anderson, Tipper Pressley

Experience the traditional Appalachian method of cooking, putting up, and preserving the bounty from nature’s garden. Receive hands-on training to make and process a variety of jellies, jams, and pickles for winter eating. You’ll also learn the importance of dessert in Appalachian culture and discover how to easily make the fanciest of traditional cakes. Completing this week of cultural foods, a day of bread making will produce biscuits and cornbread. All levels welcome.

Along with all that goodness Carolyn and I have planned a couple of field trips to allow students to see how local folks produce food for their families. The Folk School offers scholarships you can go here to find out more about them. For the rest of the class details go here.

Subscribe for FREE and get a daily dose of Appalachia in your inbox

You Might Also Like

6 Comments

  • Reply
    Gigi
    April 3, 2019 at 3:02 pm

    I dont know when we will get to do any planting. Soon i hope. We have had so much rain. It still has not dried up. I was mowing and got stuck. I love having a garden and i sure do plant by the signs. Always have. My parents always did to. God Bless!

  • Reply
    Tamela
    April 2, 2019 at 10:59 am

    Here in Central Texas we got down to 34 degrees night before last and 39 last night – very strange weather for April around here. If the weather was trying to play an April Fool’s joke on me, I guess I sorta got one over on it. Due to a series of minor family “emergencies”, all those plants I thought I’d have set out by now are still in the potting shed under lights. Loose ends to tie up this week so maybe they’ll get in the ground next week. Keep your fingers crossed for me!! Hope y’alls weather is settling down as well and everyone has a safe, delightful and productive spring and a blessed Easter. (P.S. – just have to tell someone, I just received a grant of 600 free milkweed plants to establish a Monarch Restoration habitat on our pasture!! No more family “emergencies” allowed until I get all my “babies” in the ground!!!!)

  • Reply
    Paula Rhodarmer
    April 2, 2019 at 9:25 am

    I am anxious to get my garden started, but first I have to find somebody to plow it. It seems to get harder each year to find someone, and harder to find a time when it is not too wet. Does any of your readers know someone who plows gardens in the Bethel area of Haywood County?

  • Reply
    Shirl
    April 2, 2019 at 9:09 am

    The only thing I have growing in my mini greenhouse is tomato plants. It seems like I have more and better tomatoes if I start my plants rather than buy them. Most other vegetables get planted outdoors around the first of May. It’s too cold and wet to think about doing anything in my garden yet.
    I finally cut my plum tree down after many years of trying to cover it with a bed sheet before a frost after it had already
    bloomed. Several plum trees grew along the side of the road from my school to home when I was growing up. I remember they were always loaded and no one stopped to pick them except me. They had the most delicious and unique taste. I wonder if they were wild plum trees, because the cold weather never seemed to stop them from producing fruit.

  • Reply
    Ron Stephens
    April 2, 2019 at 8:43 am

    You all are ahead of me. I have onions, lettuce, carrots, potatoes and parsley planted. But the lettuce, parsley and carrot are each apparently a total failure. All I can figure is the seed is not viable, too old I guess. Plan to replant this week.

    I know what you mean about the tree that takes awhile to make up its mind. I planted a pink dogwood years ago for my wife and nary a bloom until this year. Now it has eight I think it is. And by the way, also years ago I planted white dogwood and redbud in front of the church in the hopes they might both be blooming at the same time. For over ten years it has never happened but just maybe it will this year. Nature – full of surprises.

  • Reply
    Miss Cindy
    April 2, 2019 at 6:03 am

    It has been the longest, strangest winter weather wise that it’s hard to believe that spring is almost here!

  • Leave a Reply