Appalachia

Bucksaws

Today’s post was written by The Deer Hunter.

buck saw laying on deck

Being in the woods a lot (more so when I was younger) I’ve always carried a few things with me that would make my trip easier or more enjoyable.

A small axe, a fire kit, and almost always a small folding saw especially during hunting season. Sometimes I need to be able to cut larger pieces of wood than I can with my folding saw. I recently built my own take-down bucksaw.

The design I used is an old one I copied off the web.

bucksaw took apart

The two upright pieces are from an old broken hoe handle, I used a cedar board for the middle fulcrum and a small cedar paddle up top wound with 550 paracord to tighten the saw, and two cut off 16 penny nails for pinning the blade.

I paid ten bucks for the blade and the rest of the materials I had on hand.

 

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A post shared by Tipper (@blindpigandacorn) on

This saw cuts like nobody’s business, its cheap, and best of all it takes down and goes together in seconds. It also takes up little room in a pack so I can carry it to with me and quickly assemble when I need to use it.

The Deer Hunter

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21 Comments

  • Reply
    Darrell Keith Cook
    April 14, 2020 at 10:27 pm

    Where did you buy the blade? Do you have a preference on blade type or vendors? Thanks.

    • Reply
      Tipper
      April 23, 2020 at 4:22 pm

      Darrell- I finally remembered to ask where my husband got the saw blade from. He said he got it off Amazon-it was only 9$ but it works well!

  • Reply
    Bill Burnett
    April 9, 2020 at 8:39 pm

    Great job Matt even though it reminds me of the cords of fire wood I cut with Bow Saw when I was a youngin and my Dad was working a job. We never could afford a Chainsaw so I spent many hours with that Bow Saw.

  • Reply
    Miss Cindy
    April 9, 2020 at 1:01 pm

    Good job! When I first saw the saw I couldn’t wait to get my hands on it. It’s light weight and so smooth. It’s beautiful as well as functional. I’m so proud…you all know that the Deer Hunter is my boy! He never ceases to amaze me with the things he can make. He can make/fix anything. He studies on things and always comes up with an answer!

  • Reply
    Gigi
    April 9, 2020 at 12:17 pm

    Thats so neat, i need one of them. It seems very sharp. Be handy to carry around in the woods.

  • Reply
    Ken Roper
    April 9, 2020 at 12:10 pm

    Tipper,
    And Matt, that’s a fine Bucksaw you built. When I was younger and full of energy, my 4th oldest brother took me to school with him just to show me off. I don’t remember what grade he was in, but he was in High School. His name was Paul, but we called him Buster. He could climb like nobody’s business. (I’m the only one of 6 boys left, kinda like The Last of the Mohicians.)

    We had a Yellow Cherry Tree above the house. It was a big tree, had 4 prongs about the same size and Daddy had kept an eye on it to see when the Cherries were ready. We had Red Cherries too, but were on the other side of the holler. Since we had a pretty large family, Daddy had a Corn and potato field in between. An apple orchard was above all this, and we had many Old Timey Apple Trees all in a row. Someone , before us, had planted lots of Apple Trees and Cherry Trees years earlier.

    Ole Buster climbed way up in that Yellow Cherry Tree and sawed the limb out. Daddy made us get back so we wouldn’t get hit when the limb came down and we picked 2 wooden hampers full and carried to Mama, who was waiting at home. She canned ’em for the Wintertime to make Cherry Cobblers. …Ken

  • Reply
    PinnacleCreek
    April 9, 2020 at 11:44 am

    Thanks to the Deerhunter for such a common sense post. I found this very interesting. I found a little saw on Amazon that has served me well for pruning along with one of those gizmos that reach far into the tree and prunes. My little saw is limited, and will not cut through really thick pieces of wood. That looks as though it would do the trick. Let us know when you start making these, for everybody needs helpful tools 🙂 I have gone for walks in woods in the past, and inevitably I have wished I was more prepared. I have needed something to dig, cut or even eat or drink many times. Great to hear from you, and hope to see more of your helpful and informative posts on here. This one deserves a spot on one of the YouTube tutorials.

  • Reply
    Sheryl Paul
    April 9, 2020 at 9:56 am

    The ongenuity of those that do for themselves. Fantastic

  • Reply
    Quinn
    April 9, 2020 at 9:54 am

    What a fine job the Deer Hunter made of this! I would use a saw that size at least once a week here at my place. I use a small bow saw that I bought during my very first trail maintenance job at an Audubon wildlife sanctuary back in – gosh – over 30 years ago. I recently tried to buy a replacement blade for it and couldn’t find one that wasn’t made in China, so now I guess I need to learn to sharpen a bow saw blade.
    p.s. If The Deer Hunter decides to go into the buck saw business, I’d like to sign up now as his first customer. I would treasure my saw, and prove it by putting it to use on a very regular basis!

  • Reply
    tmc
    April 9, 2020 at 9:16 am

    Nicely done, Just as good as any store bought and even better cause you built it, I think about the ole song recorded by Hank Jr, Country Boy can survive.

  • Reply
    Ron Stephens
    April 9, 2020 at 8:34 am

    There’s me an idea for the assorted handles I have. You certainly are a can-do guy. I wish I were moreso.

    I like to use an axe, especially an Hudson Bay. But in the woods I like that a saw is so much quieter as well as being lighter, faster and neater. And in your case, yours has the great advantage of you having made it yourself.

    I have an aluminum Swedish design folding saw in which the blade and one arm nest inside the handle. Assembled it forms a triangle. I have had it for around 40 years. Once upon a time I carried it backpacking. To me at least it was well worth its weight.

  • Reply
    Brynne
    April 9, 2020 at 8:32 am

    OK, Matt has caught my attention — but next he needs to write a post that tells a city girl why exactly he would need a handy bucksaw when he’s out in the mountains . . .

    • Reply
      Tipper
      April 9, 2020 at 8:25 pm

      Brynne-thanks for the comment. I use the saw to cut larger pieces of wood for blind building, for wood when I need to build a fire, and for clearing out around a campsite.

      TDH

      • Reply
        Brynne
        April 10, 2020 at 8:15 am

        Thank you for responding. I learn so much at Blind Pig!

  • Reply
    Jim Casada
    April 9, 2020 at 7:58 am

    Matt’s fuller of useful tricks than a pet ‘coon, and he’s evidently putting this forced stay at home situation to good use. That’s a sho nuff nifty buck saw. I assume, based on the photograph of it assembled, that he can use adjustment of the parachute cord to get the proper amount of tension for the blade.
    Jim Casada

    • Reply
      Tipper
      April 9, 2020 at 8:27 pm

      Jim-yes that’s how it works the cord can be adjusted as needed.

      TDH

  • Reply
    Lonnie Baker
    April 9, 2020 at 6:29 am

    Love the posts from the Deer Hunter. Keep them coming.

  • Reply
    Trent Wren
    April 9, 2020 at 6:28 am

    How does he shield the blade when he’s packing it around so the teeth don’t chew up everything in sight? I’ve never found a fully satisfactory way to shield it.

    • Reply
      Ron Stephens
      April 9, 2020 at 10:10 am

      How about a 3/4 or 1 inch dia. PVC with friction hold caps on each end. Could re-use lots of ways when the blade was out.

    • Reply
      Paul
      April 9, 2020 at 8:08 pm

      Old piece of garden hose cut the length of the blade cut it open an walla

    • Reply
      Tipper
      April 9, 2020 at 8:26 pm

      Trent-I use a piece of an old water hose sliced down the middle. A piece of pvc pipe with caps would also work well.

      TDH

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