Appalachian Food Preserving/Canning

Pickled Beans And Corn – The Old Time Way

pickled beans and corn

The first time I ever tasted Pickled Beans and Corn was back in the day when The Deer Hunter and I were dating. Seeing the pan of green beans and corn cooking on the stove-I wondered why these people mixed up their beans and corn before cooking, but was too shy to ask.

I must admit when I first tasted the mixture I thought something was wrong with it and hoped no one noticed when I scraped it into the garbage can.

Pickled beans and corn was a food that had to grow on me. Now I crave the stuff. One of my favorite meals is fried deer meat, stewed potatoes, cornbread, pickled beans and corn, and a glass of sweet tea-it just don’t get any better than that.

In the days before grocery stores, freezers, and canning jars folks had to have a way of preserving food to make it through the winter. Often they chose the pickling/fermenting method.

For pickling a large amount of food they used crocks, large pottery containers. Before crocks were plentiful folks used wooden tubs. After the fermenting process was complete the mixture could be stored in the crock and folks would dip out the product as they needed it.

Over the years as my love of Pickled Beans and Corn has grown I’ve decided The Deer Hunter’s Dad, Papaw Tony, is the master of pickling beans and corn. Here is his recipe:

Papaw’s Recipe is for a 8 Gallon Crock-1 Bushel of Green Beans, 5 Dozen Ears of Corn, 3 Large Heads of Cabbage, Peppers to taste-you can use-banana, jalapeno, or cayenne (or you can leave the peppers out completely), 2 lbs of Pickling Salt-DO NOT use Iodized Salt it will not pickle. Papaw follows the signs and makes Pickled Beans and Corn when the signs are in the Head.

washing beans for pickling

First: String and break green beans, wash well in sink.

beans in pot for pickling

Blanch-put in pot bring to a boil-drain-rinse again, put back in pot and boil for 30 minutes, drain and cool. (We use a gas fish fryer/turkey cooker to cook outside-this keeps the house cooler-and cooks faster)

boiling corn for pickling

Shuck and silk corn, bring water to a rolling boil-then add ears of corn-cook for 45 seconds. (Papaw says “if you don’t bring the water to a boil first-before adding the corn-you will over cook the corn”)

Drain corn, cool, cut off the cob.

Chop cabbage-Papaw uses a food processor-chop the cabbage to a small consistency-but not as small as you would for slaw. Papaw adds cabbage-because his Mother did-if you don’t want to add cabbage leave it out-the recipe will still work. You do not cook the cabbage.

Chop up peppers-the amount you add depends on your taste. The Deer Hunter likes his with a little heat-so he added about 10 Jalapeno Peppers. Me-I’m hoping he didn’t add to many because I don’t like it hot. Remember you can use-banana peppers-jalapenos-or cayenne peppers. Or you can leave the peppers completely out.

adding salt

Now it’s time to put all the ingredients into the crock. Begin with a layer of salt in the bottom of crock, next layer of green beans-about 1 1/2 inch thick, layer of corn 1 1/2 inch thick, layer of cabbage 1 1/2 inch thick, sprinkle a few peppers, add another layer of salt.

Repeat the layering process until you reach the top of the crock.

When you’ve layered in all the ingredients-you add enough warm tap water to cover the mixture. As the water mixes with the salt, it will be the brine that pickles the corn, beans, and cabbage.

Use a kitchen plate to push all the ingredients under the brine water. Weight it down with 2 mason jars filled with water. Cover with a towel. After about 2 weeks the pickling will be finished.

After 2 weeks taste the mixture and if you don’t think its quite right yet-leave it another week or so and check again. It is totally normal for a film of moldy looking goop to be on the very top of the mixture. Just take a spoon, ladle it off, and discard it. If the entire crock goes bad-don’t worry you’ll totally know it by the smell-and the bugs that will be in it.

You can leave the mixture in the crock-or remove and can. We can ours using the open kettle method of canning (which means getting the pickles hot and the jars hot)-it will last several years after being canned. If you would rather-water bath the jars for 15-20 minutes.

Making Pickled Beans and Corn is quite a process, but it is so worth it that we make them almost every year.

Have you ever eaten Pickled Beans and Corn? Do you like them? Have you ever used a crock for pickling?

Tipper

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99 Comments

  • Reply
    David
    May 4, 2020 at 1:03 pm

    I love this post about pickled beans and corn. I grew up at the base of the Cohutta Wilderness in North Georgia in a small farming community. Pickled beans and corn was a regular dish year-round for us — and one of my absolute favorites! As a child, I remember watching my nanny make them. I helped with stringing and breaking the beans and even cutting the corn. And I remember the process of filling the crock. My nanny would put a plate upside down on top of every thing, then weight it down with a rock that she only used for pickling. She would then wrap the top of the crock in cloth and tie it with a piece of sting or twine. She too would ONLY pickle in the head or heart signs. I’ve always known everything that was involved with making pickled beans and corn but also always had a few questions. Thanks for this posts – now I have the missing piece to my puzzle and will be trying my own pickling this year!

    • Reply
      SelinaL
      May 19, 2020 at 8:25 am

      Your post sounds like my own memories with my Granny in Southwest Virginia! I’ve craved this for years & I think this has filled in the missing pieces enough for me to try. I’ve already got her old crocks on standby!

  • Reply
    Kevin
    October 3, 2018 at 12:26 pm

    My mom used to make pickled beans all the time, heat them in a cast iron skillet and I loved them, I am 45 years old and mom is gone, I have been craving them for the last few years. After several weeks of looking I was finally able to purchase a couple of crocks. Unfortunately, garden season is over. I have never been able to have a garden due to soil conditions so I always have to rely on friends. Might have to find a few to make some extra space next year and plant me some green beans. Just out of curiosity, I am assuming that buying green beans in a store would not pickle due to all the preservatives added to them, is that correct?

    • Reply
      tipper
      October 15, 2018 at 4:47 pm

      Kevin- Thank you for the comment! Glad you’ve got good memories of pickled beans too! As long as you bought fresh green beans at the grocery store I think they’d be ok. I don’t think the canned ones would work though.

      Glad you got some crocks!

      Tipper

      • Reply
        Kevin Huffman
        November 16, 2019 at 1:00 pm

        so I have attempted twice to make pickled beans in my crocks. The first time they was left for approximately 4 weeks. All I had was salty beans, The second time I left them for approximately 6 weeks and again all I had was salty beans. I did use pickling salt and had no luck with the pickling part, just salty. The only other thing I can think of is possibly the wrong kind of green beans? does that make a difference? I know my mom always used half runner beans. Both times I tried half runner beans was not available. I used tenderettes and another kind I can’t remember what they was. Does the kind of green beans make a difference maybe?

        • Reply
          Tipper
          November 25, 2019 at 9:50 am

          Kevin-Yikes I’m sorry! I really don’t think the type of bean would matter, although like your mom we always use white half runners. Did you make them under the right zodiac sign? We like to make fermented things when the signs are in the head, although I’ve heard other people like the heart. My only other thought is maybe use less salt next time? I have had this happen with kraut before and I couldn’t see any reason why the cabbage didn’t ferment instead of just being salty. If you could find a small crock you could try a small batch using less salt and making sure the sign was right. That way if it goes wrong again you wouldn’t have spent so much time work and money. I’m sorry I wish I could be more help!

      • Reply
        Glenda
        June 6, 2020 at 1:00 pm

        I love pickled beans and corn. When we don’t have fresh beans and corn, we use canned from the store. We use mason jars, not the crocks, and only do the beans and corn.

        Glenda

  • Reply
    Phyllis
    September 15, 2018 at 7:42 pm

    Thank you for this recipe. My Mother & Grandmother always made Pickled Beans (which included corn). I could care less; I was a teenager; WHO CARES???? When I married 44 years ago, my Mother-in Law made “Chow”, which is more like your recipe, with the cabbage & cayenne peppers. My MIL passed 22 years ago, & my sweet Mother 2 years ago & I realized it is now up to me to do what needs to be done. There is NOTHING better than my M-I-L’s “chow” (pickled beans, corn, & cabbage for newbies), baked WHITE sweet potatoes, & cornbread. Today I canned 19 quarts of the awesome concoction that had been brewing for THREE (not 2) weeks. Thank you so much. We had 1/2 qtr. left over and had for dinner with meatloaf tonight. AWESOME….

  • Reply
    Paula Vibert
    December 7, 2017 at 1:38 am

    Tipper:
    My husband and I made pickled beans and corn according to your recipe (made a half batch) and it is awesome! I find myself craving it. My great aunt in North Carolina used to give my mother her pickled beans and corn occasionally when I was young. Didn’t much appreciate it then but boy, do I now! We also made a crock of sauerkraut afterwards and all I can say is yum, yum, yum. I have a great recipe for a Rueben casserole, if anyone is interested, that really highlights the homemade sauerkraut.

  • Reply
    Tipper
    August 25, 2017 at 7:11 pm

    Natalie-I’m not sure whats going on with your corn. The only thing I can think of is maybe scraping the cob gets the water to thick? Hopefully someone with more information will read your comment and reply. In the mean time here is another recipe that is much easier for making pickled corn: https://blindpigandtheacorn.com/blind_pig_the_acorn/2012/09/pickled-corn-maybe.html
     

  • Reply
    Natalie
    August 25, 2017 at 4:58 pm

    The water in my pickled corn gets very thick and sticky. Am I doing something wrong? (I cut the corn off the cob and scrape the cob. I use pickling salt and tap water.) Also am I supposed to replinish the water every day if it needs it?

    • Reply
      William
      July 24, 2018 at 6:37 pm

      If your pickling corn, never scrap the cob. Scraping gets all the milky juices and will make your water thick and sticky.
      I like to put ears of corn in boiling water for 5 minutes and then cut off the cob. I then place the corn in pint jars and add 1 teaspoon of pickling salt and fill with hot water. Screw lids on top of the jars and then back them off one half to one full turn, you donot want the lids tight. I place the jars of corn under the sink on a towel and let set for about 14days. Some like to leave it longer and some like it less, its just a matter of personal taste. The corn will work off and leak out as it pickles, just keep a check and top off with more salt and water. When the corn has pickled to suit your taste, take the jars out and remove the lids and wash. Wipe down the jar tops. Place washed and sterilized lids back on jars, tighten this time, and place upside down, Lids down, in water bath canner. Add just enough water to cover the lids and bring to boil for ten minutes. Remove jars and place upright on a towel to cool. The lids should seal and the pickled corn will last for years. Any jars that dont seal should be kept in the refridgerator until eaten.

  • Reply
    Michael Barnabi
    August 19, 2017 at 3:26 pm

    Reread my last comment and realized my typing was hurried and the recipe needed some clarity.
    I love reading the old pickling recipe articles. My mother use to pickle corn, beans, and kraut in separate crocks. One difference though, my mom would always sew large white linen bags (or use white linen pillow cases) to suspend her goodies in the crocks. Her crocks were 5-gallon units. She would mix pickling salt with warm water in the crock (3/4-cup per gallon) filled half-way. Drape the bag over the top and fill it with goodies. As she filled the bag it sank into the crock. When reasonably filled she would twist the top of the bag and press out the air and tie it off. She would place a large plate on top of the closed bag with a sanitized river rock to keep the bag submerged. She would add fresh water to the solution till the rock was half covered.
    The signs were observed when pickling (signs in the head). 3-weeks following the event the bags were opened. Magic time, full ears of corn waiting to be devoured. Kraut and green beans you could scoop out with a cup. Get what you want, close the bag and let it remain in the crock until you are ready to do some canning.
    Going to mix up a batch this year. Try the full ears of corn. Awesome. Mom cut her kraut off of the cabbage cob and would pack the cobs in the bottom of the bag for a special treat for us kids. DELICIOUS.
    Mike B.

  • Reply
    barbara lunsford davis
    July 5, 2017 at 12:44 pm

    Could you please tell me where to get a book on when the signs are wherever?I would like to plant by the signs also.Thanking you in advance. Barbara Davis

  • Reply
    Joan
    May 4, 2017 at 11:35 pm

    Love them my mamaw cooked her beans first g

  • Reply
    Tipper
    September 17, 2016 at 11:07 am

    Pamela-Since I’ve never used raw greenbeans I’m not sure how you should process them. Maybe someone else will chime in with an answer. Or you might try googling how to make pickled beans using raw greenbeans and see if someone else has described the process. Good luck!

  • Reply
    Pamela Roop
    September 17, 2016 at 9:32 am

    I’m new to pickling beans, but I didn’t cook mine. Only mixed 1 gal Spring Water and 1 cup pickling salt. I let them sit for 14 days. My family says they are the best they’ve had. I don’t care for corn or beans pickled.
    Now my question…I want to remove them from the container and put in jars. Do i just put the brine in with them? Do I have to hot bath them?
    Please hurry need container for next batch.
    Thanks
    Pam

  • Reply
    Diana
    September 16, 2016 at 10:03 am

    Just saw the questions about not cooking the corn or beans beforehand. I don’t think that would work but have never tried it. Pickled beans and corn is a favorite of our family. When cooking, I fry fat back in my cast iron skillet and then pour the pickled beans and corn into the grease, water and all. It is delicious.

    • Reply
      Phyllis
      September 15, 2018 at 7:53 pm

      Cook the beans & corn. Believe me!

  • Reply
    Diana
    September 5, 2016 at 4:28 pm

    I am canning my pickled beans and corn as we speak. I use corn and beans and cabbage in crock. I only kept it in crock 9 days but it taste great. Both my grandmas made it and passed it down to me. I use cheesecloth to cover the crock. I stir and taste every day. Family favorite.

  • Reply
    Tipper
    September 2, 2016 at 11:33 am

    Hazel-I’m not sure what would happen if you didn’t cook the vegetables first. I would think the beans would be too tough to eat. Maybe if somebody else knows they’ll chime in a with a comment too. 

  • Reply
    Hazel
    August 31, 2016 at 11:08 pm

    What happens if the beans and corn is not cooked before putting them in crock to pickle?

  • Reply
    Tipper
    August 31, 2016 at 7:21 pm

    Wanda-I would leave them in the crock for another 2 weeks or more-sometimes the fermenting process takes longer. 

  • Reply
    Tipper
    August 31, 2016 at 3:40 pm

    Buck-thank you for the comment! No vinegar in Papaw’s recipe-the pickling process happens through fermentation : ) I have never tried it with squash, but I did make a small batch with cabbage, peppers, and cucumbers this summer and it turned out great. Hope this helps!

  • Reply
    Buck
    August 31, 2016 at 12:43 pm

    No vinegar in recipe ? ??any other variations or salt types non iodized of course…have you tried summer squash or zucchini , eggplant …cucumbers…etc….Shaloam Great work &good sharing…..GOD BLESS

  • Reply
    Wanda smith
    August 30, 2016 at 10:49 am

    What can I do if my pickled beans and corn taste to salty

    • Reply
      Phyllis
      September 15, 2018 at 7:52 pm

      Wash them!

    • Reply
      Phyllis
      September 15, 2018 at 7:54 pm

      Wash them or soak in water prior to cooking. Believe me!

  • Reply
    Tipper
    June 21, 2016 at 4:59 pm

    Mike
    Thank you for the comment and for sharing your mothers method of pickling! I have never heard anyone describe it before-but you know it makes good sense to me : ) I hope you have a great evening and I hope you drop back by the Blind Pig often!

  • Reply
    Mike Barnabi
    June 20, 2016 at 11:22 pm

    I love reading the old articles. My mother usevto pickle corn, beans, and kraut in seperate crocks. One difference though, my mom would always sew large bags (pillow case like) to suspend her goodies in the crocks. Her crocksvwe 5-gallon units. She would mix pickling salt with wsrm water in the crock, drape the bag over the top and fill it with goodies. As she filled the bag it sank intobthe crock. When reasonably filled she would twist the top of the bag and tie it off. Push the goodies down and place a large plare on top with a throughly scrubbed river rock on top. She would add fresh water to the solution till the rock was half covered.
    The signs were observed when pickling. 3-weeks following the event the bags were opened. Magic time, full ears of corn waitingbto be devoured. Kraut and green beans you could scoop out with a cup. Get what you want, retwist the bag and let it remain in the crock until you are ready to do some canning.
    Going to mix up a batch this year. Try the full ears of corn. Awesome. Mom cut her kraut off off of the cabbage cob and would pack the cobs in the bottom of the bag for a special treat for us kids. DELICIOUS.

  • Reply
    Tipper
    August 31, 2015 at 1:24 pm

    Mimi-don’t drain the water use it to pack the beans and corn in : )
    Blind Pig The Acorn
    Celebrating and Preserving the
    Culture of Appalachia
    http://www.blindpigandtheacorn.com

  • Reply
    mimi
    August 31, 2015 at 8:31 am

    Hello I need to know after the beans and corn have pickled. Do I drain the water and add fresh before putting them in the jars to can? Thank you!

  • Reply
    Tipper
    August 12, 2015 at 6:42 am

    Renita-I have never used coarse sea salt but I don’t see why it wouldn’t work. If you try it let us know how it turns out!
    Tipper
    Blind Pig The Acorn
    Celebrating and Preserving the
    Culture of Appalachia
    http://www.blindpigandtheacorn.com

  • Reply
    Renita
    August 11, 2015 at 9:38 pm

    Can you use coarse sea salt instead of pickling salt for the mixed pickles?

  • Reply
    Ruth Ann Willson-Quick
    August 11, 2015 at 5:10 am

    Found this this morning..my mom used to am,e beans like this every year and they kept just fine in the furitcellar..despite what everyone says about having to use a pressure canner..now I am going to try the beans and corn because I have too many beans..and I like the addition of the one jar at a time method…because that’s what she did…she lived to 90 +, never used a pressure canner or not water bath processing for her bean jar at a time method..have we become too worried about bacteria I wonder..

  • Reply
    Tipper
    August 10, 2015 at 4:15 pm

    Paula
    Thank you for the comment! Unfortunately I don’t know the answer to your question. Hopefully a Blind Pig Reader will chime in with the answer. The only thing I can think of is maybe a potter?
    Let us know if you discover an answer and we’ll share your knowledge : )
    Tipper
    Blind Pig The Acorn
    Celebrating and Preserving the
    Culture of Appalachia
    http://www.blindpigandtheacorn.com

  • Reply
    Paula Hunsinger
    August 8, 2015 at 9:33 pm

    I have a large crock that was my mom’s. I was told that the finish on the inside has worn off and that it needs to be redone. Where would I take it to have this done? I want to make some pickled beans and corn sooooo bad!! My grandmother used to make this and I haven’t had any in many years. I can ‘taste’ them, but can’t make ’em!!!! Help!

  • Reply
    Phyllis Owens
    October 11, 2014 at 10:51 am

    My mother made pickled beans every year and would always tell us about when she was a child they left them in the crocks all winter. Hearing her stories of having to break the ice on top to get to the beans or sauerkraut used to amaze me. She would always hide a few ears of corn on the cob amongst the beans and corn as special treat for us kids. She also pickled Crowder peas and purple hull peas in this same manner. I have beans and corn processing now in her old 15 gallon butter churn. Can’t wait to cook some.

  • Reply
    Tipper
    September 20, 2014 at 9:32 am

    Krystee
    Thank you for the great comment! Hard to say what went wrong with the one crock. When you say went bad do you mean spoiled? If so I’d say either there wasn’t enough salt. But its really hard to say for sure : ) I am thrilled you come out with one good crock and that your Mother had such good memories about them : )
    Tipper
    Blind Pig The Acorn
    Celebrating and Preserving the
    Culture of Appalachia
    http://www.blindpigandtheacorn.com

  • Reply
    Krystee Ervin
    September 17, 2014 at 7:58 am

    I decided to follow your recipe for pickled corn and green beans. I didn’t have an 8 gal crock, so I had to split it between 2 smaller crocks. One crock was fantastic, the other went bad. Any ideas? Did I not get enough salt in one? I can’t thank you enough for this post. As soon as we started canning it my mom said ” this smells just like Mama’s”. All the work was worth that one memory.

  • Reply
    Teresa Cabe Speed
    September 12, 2014 at 11:33 am

    Want to make the pickle beans and corn. Helped make this as a child. How much salt? Please advise the measurements in layers. Two tbsp. etc? Love your site.
    Thank you,
    Teresa, Macon County NC

  • Reply
    Tammie P
    September 2, 2014 at 12:11 am

    I love this site I had forgotten how much salt to use . Hadn’t pickled corn this way for years, this is the best way and reminds me of the corn grandma had in crock. Yummy. I have used gallon glass jars to and put in dark . So happy I found your site I’m doing my beans ,corn and cabbage tomorrow. I love pickled . This is the best way to do it . Hope to pass this old way to grand kids .

  • Reply
    Tipper
    August 22, 2014 at 12:24 pm

    Thanks for the comment!!! Use the pickling brine to can the pickled beans and corn. Good luck-I hope they turn out perfect : )
    Tipper
    Blind Pig The Acorn
    Celebrating and
    Preserving the
    Culture of Appalachia
    http://www.blindpigandtheacorn.com

  • Reply
    Dalene Mast
    August 22, 2014 at 10:53 am

    I made the pickled corn and beans a week ago, have not checked them yet but I have a question about canning them. Do you can the corn and beans in the brine they pickled in or do you drain them and add fresh water. Thank you for the recipe brings back memories about my grandmother, if they work, I will be sharing with my 90 year old Dad.

  • Reply
    Tipper
    August 20, 2014 at 2:11 pm

    Debbie-thank you for the comment! I do not think it would matter what type of corn you use-yellow or white should be fine : ) Good luck!
    Tipper
    Blind Pig The Acorn
    Celebrating and Preserving the
    Culture of Appalachia
    http://www.blindpigandtheacorn.com
    On Wednesday, August 20, 2014 1:05 PM,

  • Reply
    Debbie
    August 20, 2014 at 1:05 pm

    We ate pickled corn with fried sweet potatoes and cornbread growing up in Kentucky. It was delicious having the sweet/sour flavor. I was looking on the web to find the recipe and type of corn used for pickling when I found your site. My mom used a white corn which I think was silver queen. Does it really matter what type of corn you use?
    DA in PA

  • Reply
    paulette wallace hayes
    July 24, 2014 at 6:48 pm

    love the stories i am from Olive Hill KY ate Pickled Corn and Beans still love them and im 70 years old going to make some again hope to get some corn this year thanks again

  • Reply
    Ron Banks
    July 14, 2014 at 12:43 pm

    Tipper, just checked my mix after three weeks and it is really good. It was my first try. In southern Ohio , where I came from we always did our beans and corn in different crocks. I still love the corn on the cob, but I will make a batch or this every year from now on. Thanks you
    Ron Banks
    Pueblo West, Colorado

  • Reply
    Tipper
    September 30, 2013 at 9:34 am

    Rose-good to hear from you! Hard to say what happened to your chow-but it wasn’t leaving it too long. We leave ours at the very least 14 days-sometimes longer than that. I would guess you should have let it work a little longer before canning it or maybe cut back on the salt slightly.
    I’ve never used frozen corn so I can’t say for sure how that would work out. But we do always cook our corn-for about 45 seconds before cutting it off and adding it to the
    mixture.
    Hope this helps!
    Tipper
    Blind Pig The Acorn
    Celebrating and Preserving the
    Culture of Appalachia
    http://www.blindpigandtheacorn.com

  • Reply
    Rose Shepherd
    September 29, 2013 at 8:04 pm

    Hi
    I tried fixing chow last year. It was so sour I washed it a couple times. Still sour but we could eat it. What did I do wrong ? I left it 8 days my sister-in-law said I left it to long? Can I use frozen corn in my chow and do I cook the corn?
    Thanks
    Rose
    Haywood County NC

  • Reply
    Tipper
    September 16, 2013 at 3:28 pm

    Karen-thank you so much for your lovely words! I’m so glad you are able to enjoy canning like your Mother and passing it along to your daughter and grandkids is just the best thing ever : )
    Tipper
    Blind Pig The Acorn
    Celebrating and Preserving the
    Culture of Appalachia
    http://www.blindpigandtheacorn.com

  • Reply
    Karen Shaffer
    September 16, 2013 at 2:02 pm

    Tipper, I really enjoyed your post. My Mom & I used to can our pickle mix this way. she always called it ” Hot Mix”. She would also just take cabbage, green tomatoes, & hot peppers cut up & make what she called “Hot Tomato Kraut”. This brought back so many good memories of those times & got me back into canning again. I had not been canning anything for years & had forgotten how much I enjoyed it! Mom’s been gone for years now, but since getting back into this way of canning again, I can feel her presence so close to me. It’s so important to keep the old ways alive to pass down to our children! Now, my daughter is learning how to can this way & I just wanted to say Thank you for bringing back good memories to pass down to her & hopefully as her daughter gets older, she will like it as well as my daughter does & keep it going for generations! My Mom had nine daughters & only three of us enjoy canning like she did. Unfortunately, one sister has passed away, but I’m hoping that out of all the grandchildren & great grandchildren Mommy had, that some will continue to keep these traditions going. Again, thank you & God bless you & your family.

  • Reply
    Alice Jones
    July 12, 2013 at 7:17 pm

    Tipper,I wanted to let you know that my corn and beans have been in the crock one week I just could not wait to check them so we did last nite and they were wonderful and brought back the memories of my mother-in-laws from years ago.I will wait the full two weeks and can them and will be taking her some I hope they bring back memories for her.I also have lots of silver queen corn coming in I hope I will still have some when I take the beans and corn out of my crock because I want to fix some pickled corn on the cob.
    Thank you again for keeping these recipes out there.
    Alice Jones
    Pauline SC

  • Reply
    Tipper
    June 29, 2013 at 1:12 pm

    Alice-thank you for the comment! Our crock doesn’t have a lid either-just drape a clean towel over the crock as a lid-you can tie it around the top of the crock to keep it secure. I sure hope the pickled beans and corn turn out good for you and for your mother-in-law too!
    Tipper
    Blind Pig The Acorn
    Celebrating and Preserving the
    Culture of Appalachia
    http://www.blindpigandtheacorn.com

  • Reply
    Alice Jones
    June 29, 2013 at 12:38 pm

    Thank you for the recipe my mother-in-law fixed these many years ago and they are wonderful I had ask her about the recipe and she has gotten to where she does not remember a lot of things so I googled it and found your site I plan on making them when the signs are right in July and when I go to visit my mother-in-law I’m going to take her some.I do have a question and that is do you have to put a lid on the crock as mine does not have one and mine is a 5 gallon one so I plan on halfing your recipe do you think this will work again thank you fro the memories

  • Reply
    Tipper
    September 27, 2012 at 9:07 am

    Melanie-I would call your local hardware stores-especially the ones which sell animal feed. If they dont have crocks they should be able to point you in the right direction!
    Blind Pig The Acorn
    Celebrating and Preserving the
    Culture of Appalachia
    http://www.blindpigandtheacorn.com

  • Reply
    Melanie Smith
    September 26, 2012 at 10:12 pm

    I’m just trying to find a crock to make pickled beans and corn (minus the cabbage and peppers) just like my grandmother used to make. Where do you find one?

  • Reply
    Helen Blackburn
    August 24, 2012 at 7:38 pm

    Wow!!! I just tasted my first batch and boy is is good! My GreatGrandma made this when I was a kid and it was usually served with hot cornbread and nothing more. I tried for years to find someone in the family who was willing to tell me how to do it, but they either didn’t know or weren’t sharing. I cant wait to take some to my Mom. What a great memory straight out of Nantahala Gorge!
    Thanks!
    Helen
    Troy, NC

  • Reply
    linda bunner tustin
    August 19, 2012 at 12:41 pm

    my mother and i make pickled beans and kraut the old way in a crock but a good way to make kraut is called green tomato ketchup layering cabbage and green tomatoes in the crock can add a few hot peppers if you like yummy

  • Reply
    Fred & Pat Russell
    July 30, 2012 at 4:05 pm

    My wife and I may two runs of corn chow by Papaw Tony’s last summer. The first run we used bell peppers in lieu of green beans and let work for eight days before canning. It was good but a bit sour to our taste. The next run we used green beans Ian lieu of bell peppers and let work for three days. The last run was th best.
    Fred & Pat Russell
    Canton, NC

  • Reply
    T Shuler
    July 4, 2012 at 7:55 pm

    Glad to see someone trying to hang on to a little of the past. Had to move out of the hills to find work sure do miss them. You can go out of the hills, but can’t change your ways. Had extra corn and beans thought I might try a run. Thanks for recipe.

  • Reply
    Phyllis Hunt
    January 17, 2012 at 6:16 pm

    How long can you eat corn from the crock and be safe? I have had it in the crock since summer. Is it still safe to eat?

  • Reply
    William Murphy
    August 13, 2011 at 2:49 pm

    I remember well my grannies pickeld beans and corn. For those that dont have a large crock, here is a simple ball jar recipe.
    Boil corn for five minutes. Drop in tub of ice water for five minutes. Cut off cob and pack in pint Ball or Mason jars. I like the wide mouth jars for this. Add on teaspoon of pickleing salt per pint right on top of the corn. (use two teaspoons of salt if you are using some of the newer hybrid sweet varities of corn).
    Pour hot water into each jar of corn until just about to run over the top of the jar. All corn must be covered with water. Add canning ring and lid but just screw down loosely snug. Place under kitchen counter for 9-14 days on top of a cloth towel. The jars will work off and emit some water. At the end of the 9-14 day period, take lids off jars and wipe down top of jars and lids to remove any residues that would prevent sealing. Reapply lids hand tight and place in water bath canner for 15-20 minutes. Let cool and lids should seal. Redo any jars whose lids donot seal. This method works very well for corn, beans, Okra, green tomatoes, or a combination of the above.

    • Reply
      Cleo Lowery
      August 3, 2019 at 9:30 pm

      Do you rinse pickled green beans and add fresh water before pressure cooking then in fruit jars, mine is really cloudy this time not sure why.

      • Reply
        Tipper
        August 4, 2019 at 2:53 pm

        Cleo-we’ve never rinsed ours before canning. Sometimes the mixture does look cloudy. I would say if it tastes okay there’s no need to worry about the cloudiness.

  • Reply
    rick
    August 4, 2011 at 12:37 am

    Thanks for this recipe…I think it is what grandma made. I wish we had gotten her’s before she passed as Mom and I have been looking for this one for years. I have some green beans ready to harvest and will try this as soon as the kraut is done and I can use the crock for this….thanks again !

  • Reply
    barbara brock
    July 25, 2011 at 5:19 pm

    Tipper,My father used to make the sauerkraut,pickled green beans and corn ,I love it.I now make it,(my father passed away)for myself and my 2 brothers.I made the kraut, but couldn’t remember how to do the corn,and beans.thank-you very much!!

  • Reply
    Misty
    July 23, 2011 at 8:15 am

    Tipper,
    I just love your blog. I just googled this topic & you were 1st in line!
    Thanks for doing what you do.
    Misty

  • Reply
    Sandy Eyler
    November 17, 2010 at 7:36 pm

    Hi Tipper…I wrote you in July and had just put together a crock of what we always called “mixed pickles” (pickled beans and corn) using 3 large restaurant sized cans of green beans and 2 of whole kernel corn. I used 4 jalapeno peppers and 6 large heads of cabbage. It was yummy and fast to put together. I don’t have the garden space to grow my vegetables so this was perfect!! I don’t care for hot pepper so I may use some heat-less pepper next time. I was happy to be able to make it with very little effort!! So Yummy!!!

  • Reply
    Mo
    September 5, 2010 at 11:06 am

    Does any body have a pickled corn on the cob recipe for a gallon glass jar. The one I am using is a half cup of pickling salt to a gallon of corn and water.

  • Reply
    Carri Dawn
    July 31, 2010 at 12:57 pm

    I am so thrilled to find your BLOG!! My family is from Franklin and these recipes are the foundation of our lives. I live in Seattle or near there and since Gran and Gramps are gone unfortunately NO ONE even tried to keep these recipes alive!!! I am going to make these and teach my family members how important this part of our History is!!
    Thank You so much for posting this so clearly!!
    Will let you know how I do !!
    Carri

  • Reply
    Carolyn McCarter Wood
    July 25, 2010 at 12:09 pm

    This is the recipe that my family ( in Haywood County, NC) called chow chow. I am SO glad I found it. Sadly, it was not until my parents were gone that I decided I must make these food memories! Thank you for this site.
    Carolyn
    Candler, NC

  • Reply
    Tipper
    July 12, 2010 at 10:39 am

    Trish-the recipe would be the same-only add more beans to replace the corn andcabbage that you dontuse. As for canning it-we use the hot pack method. Meaning we get everything hot-the beans, jars, lids, taps, and fill a hot jar with hot beans and place the hot ring/lid on.As the jar cools-it seals itself.However-if youre afraid of using this methodlook here for directions on using a water bath method: http://www.pickyourown.org/pickledbeans.htmYou dont have to use a pressure canner-cause the saltused acts as a preserver in thepickling process.
    Blind Pig The Acorn
    Music, Giveaways, Mountain Folk
    All at http://www.blindpigandtheacorn.com

  • Reply
    Trish
    July 12, 2010 at 3:14 am

    Can you please give me the recipe for pickled green beans without the corn and cabbage and also, how long will I process it in the canner for? thanks

  • Reply
    Sandy Eyler
    July 4, 2010 at 4:28 pm

    Tipper, Just made some of these mixed pickles last night. I used large 3 drained restaurant sized green beans and 2 of corn with about 6 heads of cabbage, 4 small cans of diced jalapenos. Hope it works as well.Will be waiting with watering mouth for them cooked up with a pone of corn bread made in a hot oiled square cast iron skillet. Give me a pot of soup bean some fried potatoes and I’m set….love this site. Brings back memories of my upbringing and southern roots from the hills of Dickenson County VA.
    Sandy

  • Reply
    Becky
    July 27, 2009 at 9:45 pm

    Nope, never ate it or heard of it. But would love to try it!

  • Reply
    Lindah
    July 21, 2009 at 11:49 pm

    Pickled beans and corn. I am not familiar with this…When I think of pickling, I think of vinegar, salt, seasonings, etc. I’ve done a wide variety of vegetables that way. This recipe seems to be a brine only… or did I miss something? Do you call vinegar pickled vegetables pickles, too? Talk a little more about this, please. I’m really interested.

  • Reply
    mary
    July 21, 2009 at 10:46 pm

    Granny made kraut in a crock, but I haven’t seen that. It looks so good I wish we could all have a taste!

  • Reply
    Miss Cindy
    July 21, 2009 at 7:14 pm

    Ana, are your root veggies pickled with vinegar or are they salt soured in a crock?
    If you do it with salt I’d love to hear the directions.
    Thanks
    Miss Cindy

  • Reply
    Shirley
    July 21, 2009 at 5:28 pm

    When I used to make pickles, I used the crock method. My mother had a set of crocks, but they got away from my dad. One of my kids has the only one I had, I think.
    I’ve never had pickles beans and corn, but it sounds very good.

  • Reply
    GrannyPam
    July 21, 2009 at 1:16 pm

    Sounds good to me. Never had it, though. We don’t grow corn, since it takes more room than we have. The beans will be done around here before I can get any corn.Maybe that’s why I never heard of it.
    Method is similar to my favorite, sauerkraut, but you don’t blanch anything in kraut.

  • Reply
    Farm Chick Paula
    July 21, 2009 at 9:39 am

    Sounds wonderful, Tipper- I’ve never had it but I love pickled okra. Just can’t get Hubby to eat it… oh well! Just more for me! LOL

  • Reply
    Lanny
    July 21, 2009 at 9:26 am

    I ate this as a kid but forgot all about it ’til just now. But my folks called it something other than pickled beans and corn…. Just can’t remember what the name was. Was reintroduced to corn relish a little while back, I love pickled stuff. When I was growing up there was never a meal with out something pickled on the table or in our dad’s lunch box. The content of his lunch box was way more interesting than mine.

  • Reply
    Miss Cindy
    July 21, 2009 at 8:15 am

    Tipper, those fresh beans and corn are absolutely beautiful! This is a great post with excellent directions. With these directions I think anyone could make Pickled Beans and Corn.
    I have made, and do enjoy Pickled Beans and corn, with or without cabbage. My grandmother made it with cabbage and she called it “Chow”, not to be confused with “Chow-Chow” which was a relish to eat with dried beans. She always watched the signs too.
    I like Pickled Beans best straight from the jar, cold. I guess it is because it is most sour that way and I like sour things.
    Pickled beans and Corn or Chow makes a great meal with potatoes and cornbread!
    When I pickle beans or kraut I save a few of the cabbage leaves to spread out on top of the mixture in the crock, tuck it down around the edges, to keep all the vegetables under the liquid. My grandmother sometimes used grape leaves for this.
    Instead of the quart jars full of water I use a rock to weigh down the plates that are on top of the cabbage leaves. I have several rocks that I have gathered over the years for this purpose. They are mostly river rocks that are smooth, without crevices to gather dirt and bacteria. They are scrubbed clean and stay in my cabinets with the other canning supplies.—–I had a friend once who wanted to know why I had that big rock in my dishwasher!! lol
    I have a funny kraut story for you. One of my husbands, the Fighter Pilot, loved kraut and raw cabbage. When he was a little boy his grandmother always made kraut in the summer and she quartered the cabbage core and included it in the crock. When the Fighter Pilot was visiting and out playing he would sneak into the basement, where the crock of kraut was and stick his grubby, skinny little arm into the crock and fish around till he found one of those pieces of the cabbage core and eat it. He loved those pickled cabbage cores!
    Well, he thought no one would know what he had done, but he was wrong. When he came back into the house his grandmother immediately noticed one clean arm and one dirty one…..and he was in trouble! Didn’t stop him, he did it again the next time he went to grandma’s house.lol
    When I made kraut I always included the cores, just for him!
    Love Ya!
    Miss Cindy

  • Reply
    Amy - parkcitygirl
    July 20, 2009 at 11:35 pm

    I’ve never! Sounds good though 🙂

  • Reply
    Eggsinmypocket
    July 20, 2009 at 11:08 pm

    I have never heard of pickled beans and corn…never tasted it. Looking at the pictures makes me want to try it though. I have a Japanese aunt who always used crocks to make sour crout and to pickle fish and squid in. Really enjoyed this interesting post! blessings,Kathleen

  • Reply
    Shawnee
    July 20, 2009 at 9:13 pm

    I never had pickled beans and corn mixed like this but oohh yumm.. it brings back memories of my Mamaw’s crock of pickled corn. It was a huge crock she kept in the mudroom with half ears of corn still on the cob, you just pulled one out and ate it. 😀

  • Reply
    Terry
    July 20, 2009 at 9:09 pm

    My Great Granny pickled alot of things. My Granny made the best pickled beets and chow chow. My daddy made use of the crocks by making home brewed beer. Pretty tasty on a HOT day.

  • Reply
    Jeanne
    July 20, 2009 at 8:20 pm

    Yum!! Beautiful pics! A labor of love and tradition!! I can almost taste it now. What kind of corn did you use??

  • Reply
    Pat Workman
    July 20, 2009 at 5:51 pm

    Loved this post, Tipper. Really brought back memories. Back in the 60’s & 70’s I used to pickle beans (& beans & corn) in quart jars. It was easy as long as I could find a cool dark place to let them ‘work off’–as we used to say. I also made kraut and salt brine cucumber pickles every year in 5 gallon crocks. My aunt taught me how.

  • Reply
    PictureGirl
    July 20, 2009 at 4:51 pm

    My Grandmother had a pickled recipe like this. I really like most pickled veggies and especially pickled meat.
    I have several crocks and I’m gonna make your pickled beans and corn. My beans and corn are ready and I’ve got plenty.
    Thanks for the recipe.

  • Reply
    Susan
    July 20, 2009 at 3:55 pm

    Tipper, my goodness, this takes me back to my childhood. My mother always pickled beans and corn when we lived on the farm. She did hers a little differently, though I don’t know the process or recipe she used as I was really little. I can remember those huge crocks (which my brother still has in the barn loft at the homestead). They must have been the bigger ten gallon ones. She did the beans and corn separately and left the corn on the cob. (They must have eaten the corn right after it was cured.) She didn’t put cabbage or peppers in hers, but made them the German way. Please don’t ask me to expand on that, because that’s all I know.
    I can remember going into the cellar and watching her look into the crocks and seeing that scum floating on top turned me off. I think I liked the corn better than the beans. She also pickled pig feet. Bleh.

  • Reply
    Janet
    July 20, 2009 at 3:43 pm

    My husband likes pickled corn, the only thing I like pickled is beets. I love pickled beets. I think he said his mom put the corn in jars and let it “work off”. He said it was messy that way and she would sometimes set the jars in the bathtub until they worked off.

  • Reply
    Brenda Kay Ledford
    July 20, 2009 at 3:26 pm

    Tipper,
    This is a great posting and it brought back many childhood memories. Yes, I remember pickled beans and corn. I recall breading and stringing beans until my fingers were sore and my back ached. I recall cutting corn off the cobs and spraying the oorn all over my clothes. Yes, the pickled beans and corn are good, but it takes a lot of work to make this. Great posting. I enjoyed it a lot.

  • Reply
    Pappy
    July 20, 2009 at 2:52 pm

    Hey Tipper, What’s for supper? Pickled beans and corn? Sounds great. I had chicken and dumplings, chopped greens, and black eyed peas for lunch. I’ve never had pickled beans and corn, but it sounds like something I would like. I ate a few bread and butter pickles with lunch. Yankees don’t know what they’re missing. Pappy

  • Reply
    Ana
    July 20, 2009 at 2:03 pm

    well you got me this I have NEVER had or seen. I imagine it would have to grow on me as well.
    my portuguese fam pickles as well but its a root vege list….carrots,califlower,baby onions,bell pepper chunks, all together oh yea and lil banana peppers.
    its served with fish dishes, yum fried fish crispy and hot and the salty vinegary taste of the cool vegies is great especailly with white rice!!

  • Reply
    Annie
    July 20, 2009 at 2:00 pm

    I haven’t had pickled beans since I was a little girl. Mom, Dad and my Aunt Annie loved to eat big platefuls with a piece of cornbread. I never liked it and never understood why any one else did.

  • Reply
    David Templeton
    July 20, 2009 at 1:55 pm

    I would guess that back in the 30s and 40s, pickled beans were a common preserve because in the 50s I remember them on the shelves of many a household. Back then, I thought they were repulsive; I remember thinking, why would anyone pickle beans?
    Like you, as time went on, pickled beans became a real treat for me. I don’t remember corn mixed in back then but I do see this blend at country fairs and stores that feature traditional canned treats, you know … like maybe at the Cracker Barrel; still, with the abundance of corn we expect and having planted too many green beans, I am eager to make a bunch.
    I always make kraut and I make pickles.
    I broke the last crock I had a few years back, so I use food-quality 5-gallon pails for pickling and fermenting and weight down the mass with a plate like you do your beans pickling. I wish I still had crocks for pickling; I know the food tastes better. I am too doggone cheap to buy more (look at the price on some crocks!)
    What a perfect article you have produced here. I hope all the world finds your site; and … get ready, I know they will.
    God bless you and yours.

  • Reply
    Egghead
    July 20, 2009 at 1:32 pm

    Tipper I have never heard of this before. It has my mouth watering though. My mother and grandmother used to pickle using a crock but not this particular recipe. They used to can the pickles following the two weeks though.

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