Appalachia Logging

Pap Talks about Logging

Pap--Where-We'll-Never-Grow-Old

After we had the pines cut above our house, Chatter asked Pap to talk about how many times the area had been logged in his lifetime. Click on the bar below to hear what Pap had to say. Once you’re done listening you may need to click your back button to come back to this page.

You can hear Pap talk about logging below.

I hope you enjoyed listening to Pap. Sort of a funny start to the recording when Granny tries to tell him how to tell his story : )

Tipper

 

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18 Comments

  • Reply
    Pamela Danner
    October 24, 2015 at 8:50 am

    Loved hearing Pap and Chatter (and Granny) talk about the old time logging there. I think it is so important to capture all you can while you can about the past. We still work on my Dad about the old days.
    Pam
    scrap-n-sewgranny.blogspot.com

  • Reply
    Ethelene Dyer Jones
    October 24, 2015 at 4:05 am

    I loved hearing Chatter and her Pap talk about “the old days.” This generational sharing brings real insight into “life as it was.” Thank you for posting!

  • Reply
    Mary Lou McKiliip
    October 23, 2015 at 10:10 pm

    Tipper we have always loved the Wilson Brothers on radio and go ay where they were singing and playing. Years now we have enjoyed Tipper love this family and the twins.

  • Reply
    Mary Lou McKiliip
    October 23, 2015 at 10:10 pm

    Tipper we have always loved the Wilson Brothers on radio and go ay where they were singing and playing. Years now we have enjoyed Tipper love this family and the twins.

  • Reply
    Mary Lou McKiliip
    October 23, 2015 at 10:10 pm

    Tipper we have always loved the Wilson Brothers on radio and go ay where they were singing and playing. Years now we have enjoyed Tipper love this family and the twins.

  • Reply
    Mary Lou McKiliip
    October 23, 2015 at 10:10 pm

    Tipper we have always loved the Wilson Brothers on radio and go ay where they were singing and playing. Years now we have enjoyed Tipper love this family and the twins.

  • Reply
    Ron Banks
    October 23, 2015 at 7:23 pm

    Wonderful! Pap reminds me of my daddy in the way he talks. We should all take time to talk to our older folks. They have a lot of wisdom to impart.

  • Reply
    TimMc
    October 23, 2015 at 5:57 pm

    There is so many people I wished I had interview as a young man.. You’ll treasure this forever..

  • Reply
    Ed Ammons
    October 23, 2015 at 3:18 pm

    Tipper-I still can’t listen to the whole file from your blog but I was able to download it all(7:29 minutes) to my desktop(if that’s OK.) I can listen to it now even when I’m not on the internet.
    I enjoy listening to people who talk like I do. There ain’t too many left. Everybody nowdays tries to talk like what they hear on the TV. Some don’t even speak at all. They talk with their thumbs.

  • Reply
    Tipper
    October 23, 2015 at 2:36 pm

    Sorry about that Ed : ) I loaded it again-see if itll work now!

  • Reply
    Ed Ammons
    October 23, 2015 at 2:09 pm

    I really enjoyed listening to what I could hear of Pap talking about logging in his younger days.
    The slider goes to about 2:05 and stops and goes back to 0:00. I think there is more. I tried to download the whole file to my computer but that won’t work either.

  • Reply
    Ken Roper
    October 23, 2015 at 12:55 pm

    Tipper,
    Way to go, Louzine, I guess we all
    need a straightening every now and
    then. And that’s a fine thing
    Chatter did, listening to her PawPaw tell a story.
    I was at a “gig” the girls had one time when Pap came up to me and started talking about the Cold. He said when he was just a boy, it was so cold and wood was
    so scarce that folks around
    Brasstown took up the crossties
    on the Railroad to keep warm.
    I didn’t have a “comeback” for
    that one…Ken

  • Reply
    Chuck Howell
    October 23, 2015 at 12:20 pm

    My uncle was Fireman on a Log Train near Robinsville N C in the 30’s & 40′ maybe early fifties as well. When I visited with family at the Howell Reunion in Burnsville years ago. My cousin shared a recording of Park Stone blowing the train whistle as it passed near their home, which was built by my Grandad of logs. Three rooms with a well on the L shaped porch (Bucket Type
    Each whistle blower back then had a distinctive style, sound.
    Then she sang “Life is like a Mountain Railroad” for us. This I will always remember. She died shortly after this. Remember Hank Williams song about the
    Ol Log Train ? Material for the Pressley Girls .

  • Reply
    Carolyn
    October 23, 2015 at 10:49 am

    This was very interesting about the logging. Still unbelievable how big the old trees were. Now around here in your yard if a tree gets 10 ft. tall they top them so they don’t fall on your house. People have not seen really big old trees.

  • Reply
    PinnacleCreek
    October 23, 2015 at 10:18 am

    It is so great to listen and record the old stories of bygone days. We never could get my Mom to talk if she knew it was recorded. However, some of the things she had mentioned when I was growing up led me to important info when I started genealogy. We managed to uncover priceless information about our family history.
    Keep up the good work, Tipper, by keeping an easily accessible blog to all things Appalachian.

  • Reply
    Don Casada
    October 23, 2015 at 9:31 am

    Chatter is very wise to do this, and I hope she’ll look for many other opportunities to interview Pap and Granny on any number of subjects.
    Speaking from personal knowledge, that voice recording will be a treasure to you all on down the road.

  • Reply
    Dee Parks
    October 23, 2015 at 9:02 am

    Enjoyed listening to Pap. I love trees. My great-grandfather and grandfather were timber men in East TN and NE MS,in the late 1800’s and my grandfather about 1915 thru 1930’s bought tracts of timber. They owned sawmills and would take their men in with equipment and horses and cut the timber. It was very hard work and dangerous for the men that actually cut the timber. I love just about every tree, especially Oaks and Pines. Pap is right though pines will take over a forest. I have been out to California and have seen the Redwoods but I never knew we had really old Live Oaks on the East Coast till my husband and I were coming through Brunswick, GA and saw their 900 year old Live Oak, then I was totally flabbergasted when I walked up to what they say is the oldest Live Oak (1500 + years) Angel Oak in South Carolina. The regular Oak tree’s life span can be hundreds of years but I’m not sure the regular Oak can live as long as the Live Oaks down South.

  • Reply
    Miss Cindy
    October 23, 2015 at 8:00 am

    That was interesting hearing Pap talk about the woods. So, after the big strong oaks were cut they were replaced with the pines that grew not as strong or as big as the oaks but they were quicker. They were able to dominate the forests not because they were strong but because they were quick.

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