Appalachia Sayings from Appalachia

Appalachian Sayings – Keep Your Spoon To Yourself

Best recipe for peach fruit cobbler

It’s probably been 2 years since I first heard the saying “Don’t put your spoon in someone else’s bowl.” I loved the saying the instant I heard it.

Imagine: You’re eating a big bowl full of your favorite dessert-maybe ice cream maybe peach cobbler-maybe peach cobbler and ice cream!

Just as you really start to enjoy that melt in your mouth goodness…someone you hardly know comes right up behind you and sticks their old spoon in your bowl! Can you imagine how annoying that would be? Just like its beyond annoying when someone sticks their spoon into your business.

I asked the gentleman who shared the phrase with me where he heard it. He said “My Daddy said that my whole life.” His Daddy was born and raised in Western NC.

This saying is a perfect example of the clear, concise, and colorful sayings that can be found throughout Appalachia.

Tipper

 

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25 Comments

  • Reply
    Shirley Knighten
    November 5, 2018 at 8:13 am

    If ya can’t run with the big dogs then stay on the porch.

  • Reply
    Shirley Knighten
    November 5, 2018 at 8:12 am

    Don’t climb a tree to tell a lie when you can stand on the ground and tell the truth.

  • Reply
    Jean
    January 29, 2015 at 5:46 pm

    Hi Tipper,My Grandson is great at giving his two cents when ever his mom and I are talking, so I told him this morning when ever that happens,Im going to say -get your spoon out of my soup.Thanks for the tip!LOL.Yes your blog was in another folder.Were enjoying the chickpeas!God Bless.

  • Reply
    b. Ruth
    January 29, 2015 at 5:00 pm

    also…”Don’t meddle in a happy kettle!”
    Jackie reminded me of…
    “Don’t spoon under the moon on another man’s porch!”

  • Reply
    b. Ruth
    January 29, 2015 at 4:42 pm

    Ummmmm,
    How about…”Don’t stir another persons pot!” or was it “Don’t disturb someone else’s pot!” nope that’s on a TV show!…Could have been “A watched pot never boils!” Nope it was “A boiling watch never pots!”
    I got it now,
    “Don’t stick your nose in a stinking pot, your spice will never make it taste sweeter!”~~by b. Ruth
    and “Most advice given is short lived!”
    Thanks Tipper,

  • Reply
    Cee
    January 29, 2015 at 1:58 pm

    I’ve never heard that expression before but I love it!

  • Reply
    Ken
    January 29, 2015 at 12:56 pm

    Tipper,
    I remember as a kid eating homeade
    Snowcream from a big bowl with the
    whole family. But today there’d be
    a fight right there if someone
    got into my bowl. I like these
    old sayings too…Ken

  • Reply
    Quinn
    January 29, 2015 at 12:19 pm

    I haven’t heard that one before, but now I sure do wish I had a bowl of peach cobbler and ice cream! 😉
    Have you ever heard “Put that in your pipe and smoke it”?

  • Reply
    Jackie
    January 29, 2015 at 11:51 am

    I used to hear it a long time ago in East Tennessee.
    Some others I heard back then: Mind your own beeswax; Sweep (or clean up) your own backyard and Don’t be sticking you nose where it doesn’t belong.
    Another one you may or may not have heard – Back in the fifties when The Four Lads sang Standing on the Corner Watching All The Girls Go By, my mom said to my dad, “You can work up an appetite any where you want to, but you better come home to satisfy it.”

  • Reply
    Bill Burnett
    January 29, 2015 at 10:17 am

    This is a new one for me also, I like it. One I’ve always heard and used is “Don’t measure my corn in your half bushel” basically this means don’t assume what I’ll do based on how you or someone else has reacted in a similar situation.

  • Reply
    eva nell wike, PhD
    January 29, 2015 at 9:46 am

    Well Sir, I’ll tell you the truth!That saying may have been common in Western North Carolina, but I will declare I never heard in all my life. However I will share it with my three grandsons (city boys!)
    Eva Nell

  • Reply
    JOHNNY HURT
    January 29, 2015 at 9:35 am

    TIPPER EVER HEAR THIS ONE, EVERYTHING EVENS OUT. IN THE SUMMER TIME RICH PEOPLE BUY ICE. AND IN THE WINTER TIME POOR PEOPLE GET IT FOR FREE. SEAMS TO EVEN OUT . JH

  • Reply
    PinnacleCreek
    January 29, 2015 at 9:06 am

    Sounds much like a saying I heard my family say often growing up, “Sweep off your own front porch.” Many sayings frowned on the prying into someone else’s business. How I miss all those old sayings, and is so refreshing to see what the Blind Pig has to say each morn.

  • Reply
    Sheryl Paul
    January 29, 2015 at 9:06 am

    I never heard that one, but love the way there is no doubt about what it means

  • Reply
    Sheryl Paul
    January 29, 2015 at 9:06 am

    I never heard that one, but love the way there is no doubt about what it means

  • Reply
    Sheryl Paul
    January 29, 2015 at 9:06 am

    I never heard that one, but love the way there is no doubt about what it means

  • Reply
    Sheryl Paul
    January 29, 2015 at 9:06 am

    I never heard that one, but love the way there is no doubt about what it means

  • Reply
    Steve in tn
    January 29, 2015 at 9:05 am

    Good one. Ranks up there with “let the mop flop”

  • Reply
    Luann
    January 29, 2015 at 9:01 am

    I like this! Hadn’t heard it before. In my part of the country it’s “don’t stick your nose in somebody else’s business.”

  • Reply
    Rooney Floyd
    January 29, 2015 at 8:58 am

    Reminds me of another “spoon” saying that I have always liked. It’s supposedly from Norway and is said to a friend or love one.
    “I will always share my spoon with you…”

  • Reply
    Shirl
    January 29, 2015 at 8:53 am

    That saying means the same as the one I have always heard-keep your nose out of my business. I’ve never heard keep your spoon to yourself, but I love it. Nothing irritates me more than a meddling, nosey person.

  • Reply
    dolores
    January 29, 2015 at 8:38 am

    I’ve never heard or used that saying; it was don’t stick your nose in someone else’s business. I think I will hold onto that phrase; I like it so instead of nose I’ll use spoon.

  • Reply
    Gayle Larson
    January 29, 2015 at 8:11 am

    Grandmother always said we should keep our socks in our own drawer.
    If we meddled where we shouldn’t she would say ” put your socks back in your our own drawer”.

  • Reply
    Ethelene Dyer Jones
    January 29, 2015 at 7:59 am

    Geared to make us aware of talebearing, gossip and false rumors, “Keep your spoon to yourself” also is a subtle warning of the damage these not-so-good practices can do to the reputation of others. When you think about it, our mountain philosophy was geared to make better people out of us if we followed and practiced them!

  • Reply
    Miss Cindy
    January 29, 2015 at 7:57 am

    Our sayings are very colorful and concise, aren’t they. We are a people who say what we mean and mean what we say. I like that straightforwardness about us!

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