Appalachian Dialect Celebrating Appalachia Videos

Celebrating Language

Chatter

If you’ve been reading Blind Pig and The Acorn any length of time you’ve already figured out I’m plumb foolish about Appalachian language. I just love talking about words and phrases that are found in our colorful rich way of talking.

In my latest video I’m sharing a few of those words and phrases. I even got Granny in on the act this time 🙂

I hope you enjoyed the video and that you’ll leave a comment and let me know if you’re familiar with the examples.

Help me celebrate Appalachia by subscribing to my YouTube channel!

Tipper

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29 Comments

  • Reply
    Alan
    May 25, 2021 at 9:56 am

    great video -growing up in Haywood Co, NC, I’d say I was familiar with 75% of the words/terms. A few even gave me some credibility to me when I use them and even my own wife/daughter think I made them up.

  • Reply
    Ray Presley
    May 15, 2021 at 11:04 am

    A funny story from my early days in the country. Joe and Roxie had been over to Knoxville all the day on a Saturday doing their regular “trading,” coming home only to find that someone had been in their house and had gone through all their chester drawers!”

  • Reply
    Jane ODell
    May 14, 2021 at 9:45 pm

    I loved this video! I like when the family helps. People where I grew up called a cap/hat a toboggan, but pronounced it toe’-bogin….

  • Reply
    Ron Bass
    May 14, 2021 at 7:13 pm

    Heard them all but donnick. We say walst for wasp. Thanks for your blog, it makes me feel at home.

  • Reply
    Stephanie Weismantel
    May 14, 2021 at 6:07 pm

    Tipper – I was born in Blairsville and raised in Peachtree/Marble. I have just today found your page and I’m an instant fan. Thank you for sharing!!

  • Reply
    Cynthia
    May 14, 2021 at 2:58 pm

    Enjoyed all of these. I’ve heard commenced and directly. I like language, too.

  • Reply
    Tamela
    May 14, 2021 at 12:30 pm

    Great videos! Lots of new-to-me words this time and a few just used different than I’m used to . . .

  • Reply
    Paula Rhodarmer
    May 14, 2021 at 11:49 am

    I was familiar with all of them but the one about “rocks”

  • Reply
    Frances Jackson
    May 14, 2021 at 11:43 am

    Almost all these words are familiar to me from growing up in the southwest Missouri Ozarks, and living in the Arkansas hills. Some of them I learned from my husband’s folks. My mother-in-law made the best green beans, and as a young new wife I asked her how she seasoned them. She started off with, “Well you take a right smart of bacon grease…” I listened and then asked her where I could get “right smart bacon grease.” This story went down into family legends and was told and re-told at family gatherings. I didn’t care. I learned how to season green beans, but never as well as that dear lady did. I miss her.

    • Reply
      Tipper
      May 14, 2021 at 2:28 pm

      Frances-I love that story! Thank you for sharing it 🙂

  • Reply
    Wanda Devers
    May 14, 2021 at 9:48 am

    We pronounced it “dreckly”! Sideling–That boy was “sideling” up to that girl he had a crush on! Once a fellow carpenter told my brother something was “helter skelter” on a job.

  • Reply
    Shirl
    May 14, 2021 at 9:44 am

    I loved the video! Youins sound plime blank like me and my family.

  • Reply
    Ed Karshner
    May 14, 2021 at 9:23 am

    I love our talk. I haven’t been home in so long and I miss hearing and speaking good Appalachian.

    My uncle’s favorite story is the time my great-uncle sold “punk wood” to a bunch of campers.

    The one that I’ve had the most consternation with is “toboggan.” People Off look at you like you are crazy. Even after some 20 years, my wife still struggles with the fact a toboggan is a hat!

    What a welcome video this homesick morning.

  • Reply
    Ray Presley
    May 14, 2021 at 9:07 am

    All those Appalachian words and sayings are very familiar to me – Toboggin, directly, Wasper, pounding, etc. And we ate corn bread in clabberred/butter milk, never “sweet” milk. If Matt were in “yankee” land, which is well north of the Mason-Dixon line, and someone heard him say that he wears a toboggin, they would think he was referring to a sled on his head. “Wasper” is a perfect example of the Appalachians taking a word like wasp and making it their own. And if anyone in that part of the country suspected that the people were gonna make up a “pounding” for them, they would be ready to fight! And Granny got it right with. “Tipper’s gonna take me to Peach Tree directly….I think” “Directly” in my family almost always meant anytime other than soon. And did anyone use the word, “Quar” to refer, in a nice way, to someone who was just a bit different or “off?”

    • Reply
      Stephanie Weismantel
      May 14, 2021 at 6:13 pm

      Getting “wasper stung” was definitely a huge childhood fear….of course, the snuff or tobacco spit that came next would fix you right up!

  • Reply
    Uncle Al
    May 14, 2021 at 8:57 am

    Heard most of them but not donnick.

  • Reply
    Margie G
    May 14, 2021 at 8:50 am

    Had not heard a few like the word for rock, walking on a slope but GOM is a favorite of mine. Directly is also used a lot. So I can call useless politicians old rotten pieces of wood—- the punks!!!! Say hello to your mother—- SHES a treasure and beautiful soul. I can see the kindness and strength in her eyes. I think the twins had a lot of fun in this video—- they’re absolutely adorable young ladies with winning ways. Have a blessed day in NC Pressley/ Wilson clan!

  • Reply
    Sallie the apple doll lady
    May 14, 2021 at 8:44 am

    That was plumb fun! I like the way you did it and the music. We said kerplunk but all the others were familiar to me. The bloopers were just the icing on the cake! Thanks for a little extra jocularity this morning.

  • Reply
    Ron Stephens
    May 14, 2021 at 8:19 am

    What fun! I think Chitter got tongue-tied a bit. Somehow I suspect she likes to tease her Daddy and he likes to be teased.

    I reckon I knew all of them but “donnick”and now I know it. So I have a name for all those donnicks I’m digging out at the upper edge of the garden. There is a rock rib there just about a foot deep and I raise a crop of donnicks off it every year.

  • Reply
    Miss Cindy
    May 14, 2021 at 8:05 am

    I love these Tipper, I know all these words except donick, it’s not familiar to me. I just love our colorful language. We can even make up words as needed to fit most any situation!

  • Reply
    Patricia Price
    May 14, 2021 at 7:35 am

    My people use all of them except si-gogglin’. We say “cattywampus.”

    • Reply
      Sarahg
      May 14, 2021 at 9:27 am

      We say Cattywampus too!

    • Reply
      Patricia Price
      May 14, 2021 at 12:56 pm

      And I have to ask this: I have a walnut chest that my grandfather made for me. I was a teenager before I found out that it is not a “chester drawers” but a “chest of drawers.” Does anybody else call it chester drawers?

      • Reply
        Tipper
        May 14, 2021 at 2:27 pm

        Patricia-we say chester drawers too 🙂

        • Reply
          Ed Ammons
          May 14, 2021 at 9:31 pm

          We say chestadrawers!

  • Reply
    Don Byers
    May 14, 2021 at 6:29 am

    Am familiar…..hope you are well…am “tollable” this morning.

    • Reply
      Margie G
      May 14, 2021 at 8:52 am

      I’m just fair to middlin’ this morning.

      • Reply
        Phillip Keys Holt
        May 14, 2021 at 9:01 pm

        Did fair to middlin’ used to be a grade of cotton?

        • Reply
          Tipper
          May 18, 2021 at 12:13 pm

          Phillip-it was 🙂

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