Appalachia Appalachian Dialect

Appalachian Vocabulary Test 99

 

mountain talk

It’s time for this month’s Appalachian Vocabulary Test. I’m sharing a few videos to let you hear some of the words. To start the videos click on them and then to stop them click on them again.

1. Jack up: to scold, find fault with, bear down on. “He kept tracking dirt in after I asked him not to a hundred times so I had to jack up on him.

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2. Jaggedy: having a ragged, frayed, or sharp edge. “Be careful, the edge of that broken jar is all jaggedy.”

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3. Jaw: a person’s cheek. “She was the cutest little girl you ever seen! She had those jaws that just made you want to squeeze them.”

4. Jawed: to talk idly and at length. “I told him he wouldn’t be so tired if he didn’t set up half the night jawing with them down at the store.”

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5. Job: to stab, strike, or thrust. “When the girls were little I was forever warning them not to run with sticks. I was afraid they’d job their eye out.”

I’m familiar with all of this month’s words, although I hear jack up used in a slightly more aggressive way like: “I’m going to have to go down there and jack him up if he don’t keep his long pointy nose outta my business.”

I’ve also heard of jacking someone’s jaw which means a fist will connect in a fierce manner with another’s face.

Hope you’ll leave me a comment and tell me how you did on the test!

Tipper

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25 Comments

  • Reply
    Gaye Blaine
    April 17, 2020 at 9:40 am

    Heard and understood them all growing up in Macon County. NC .

  • Reply
    Lily
    April 29, 2017 at 10:53 am

    2017 Urban dictionary version of “jacked up” is – not working properly or as intended.

  • Reply
    Dee Parks
    April 28, 2017 at 9:39 pm

    Jaggedy is the only one I use or remember; unless, it was a car that was jacked up to put a tire on.
    I’m running behind. lol I was still thinking about “catching a cold.” Yesterday’s post. I was warned about that all my growing up life. lol

  • Reply
    Ed Ammons
    April 28, 2017 at 3:50 pm

    Oh, and I forgot. “Jacked Up” is what gets done to pickup trucks here in Burke County. Some uv’em you need a ladder to climb up in. The rednecks that don’t like to be called rednecks say they are “lifted.” I’m a proud redneck and my pickup is “jacked up” a little but it come from the factory thataway.

  • Reply
    Ed Ammons
    April 28, 2017 at 3:41 pm

    Where I come from people who like to talk too much are flappy Jawed.
    As well as getting Jobbed with sharp objects we get jabbed, poked, stabbed and stuck.
    In my wife’s family the females like to pinch all the new babies’ fat little jaws. They think of it as a rite of passage. Same with shoving the babies’ faces in the cake at their 1st birthday party. The babies cry and all the adults laugh. I call it child abuse.
    I better go before somebody says I am getting flappy jawed!

  • Reply
    Bill Burnett
    April 28, 2017 at 1:32 pm

    I have heard and used all of today’s words but Jab is more often used than Job when referring to stabbing.

  • Reply
    Mike McLain
    April 28, 2017 at 1:19 pm

    I knew all of these and have used all except maybe “jaggedy”.

  • Reply
    Howland
    April 28, 2017 at 12:06 pm

    My goodness! Y’all talk the same as I do!

  • Reply
    Granny Sue
    April 28, 2017 at 11:46 am

    Yes, I’ve heard them all, and used most of them. When we use jacked up we usually mean something messed up, like “he sure jacked up that table when he tried to fix it.”) We also use jabber (talk a lot about nothing), jerry-rigged (kinda like jacked up but it works instead of messing something up), and rarely I’ve also heard jackanapes (as in someone being an a**).

  • Reply
    B. Ruth
    April 28, 2017 at 11:35 am

    Tipper,
    Heard all of these but some used a bit different. For instance, I would get all jacked-up (angry, aggravated, frustrated) if someone kept tracking in mud on the floor…been happenin’ lately as garden plus rain continues…
    Jaggety and raggety are sometimes used together alike…My jeans looks raggety since they are jaggety all around the hem!
    He thinks he has a strong jaw, but if he keeps up with that nonsense it might get broke!
    I think “dimpled-jawed sweet cheeks” was my granny’s favorite saying, since most of the grandchildren had dimples…Ha Sometimes we can’t go to K-town without running into this one feller who will “jaw on” forever!
    I “jobbed” that pick right into my shoe. It didn’t go in my foot but “scared and hurt” so bad that in my mad fit, I took that pick and “stobbed” it right in the ground taking half the ‘mater row with it!….We would use “job” and “stob” in like ways! Ha
    Thanks Tipper always love these vocabulary tests…
    PS…Please tell Jim Casada that I enjoyed his article in the “Smoky Mountain Living” magazine this month…The story he wrote of this lady makes me feel like I’ve been awfully lazy in my life at times!

  • Reply
    Ed Ammons
    April 28, 2017 at 10:46 am

    I doubt you will publish this but I have to tell it anyway. My cousin Crazy Joe had been admonished for quoting Judges 15:16 verbatim, “With the jawbone of an ass, heaps upon heaps, with the jaw of an ass have I slain a thousand men.” He was told he should replace the word “ass” with “jack.” So, the next time he repeated it, it came out as “With the assbone of a jack have I slain a thousand men.”
    That happened in Lee Clampitt’s seventh grade classroom. I was there. I witnessed it!

  • Reply
    Peggy Lambert
    April 28, 2017 at 10:22 am

    All words today are used around here. We said, I’ll box your jaws if you keep on talking.
    Peggy L.

  • Reply
    Shirl
    April 28, 2017 at 9:23 am

    All words are very common to me. We don’t exactly use ‘jack up’ the same way. I say light them up when I refer to scolding someone and jacked up when a child is hyper from eating too much candy. When my girls were small, they heard the same warning about jobbing their eyes out.

  • Reply
    Larry Griffith
    April 28, 2017 at 9:10 am

    I hear jack used as in I’ll jack your jaw. This reminds me of a fist fight I had in high school with a boy nickname Jaws. He did have huge jaws.

  • Reply
    Larry Griffith
    April 28, 2017 at 9:10 am

    I hear jack used as in I’ll jack your jaw. This reminds me of a fist fight I had in high school with a boy nickname Jaws. He did have huge jaws.

  • Reply
    Larry Griffith
    April 28, 2017 at 9:10 am

    I hear jack used as in I’ll jack your jaw. This reminds me of a fist fight I had in high school with a boy nickname Jaws. He did have huge jaws.

  • Reply
    Larry Griffith
    April 28, 2017 at 9:10 am

    I hear jack used as in I’ll jack your jaw. This reminds me of a fist fight I had in high school with a boy nickname Jaws. He did have huge jaws.

  • Reply
    PinnacleCreek
    April 28, 2017 at 9:04 am

    I have not heard jack up ever. I am sitting with an acquaintance and we agree we have both heard jacking his jaw referring to talking a lot. Also mentioned chin music as expression used in Monroe County for a wife complaining or nagging. I hope you never run out of words on Appalachian vocabulary.

  • Reply
    Ron Stephens
    April 28, 2017 at 8:59 am

    I can’t decide if I am an honest witness. Each one seems as familiar as my old jeans and I immediately know what they mean. But as to knowing when or where I have heard them or used them myself, I draw a blank.
    As usual, I feel like I once heard and used a much more colorful and expressive dialect but have lost touch with much of it and now must have very lackluster speech. Makes me homesick for long ago and far away.

  • Reply
    Sheryl Paul
    April 28, 2017 at 8:40 am

    All interesting wirxs this mo nth. We use them all except jack up. That is new to me

  • Reply
    Carol
    April 28, 2017 at 8:30 am

    I have not heard “job” used this way. I agree with you about “jacking somebody up”!

  • Reply
    Ron Banks
    April 28, 2017 at 8:29 am

    I’m familiar with all of the words today. My g-dad used job all the time. He would tell us not to run with sticks because we might fall and job a hole in us or job an eye out.
    I don’t hear it used anymore. The rest I hear from time to time.
    In regard to jaws, it was common growing up to hear about someone getting their jaws boxed. It referred to getting slapped in the face. “That boy said something ugly to her and she really boxed his jaws!”

  • Reply
    Jim Casada
    April 28, 2017 at 8:26 am

    Tipper–All are commonplace to me, although I hear (and use) “jawing” more than “jawed.”
    Jim Casada

  • Reply
    Miss Cindy
    April 28, 2017 at 8:03 am

    I’ve heard all these, Tip, and like you what I’ve heard of jack up meant physical contact between a fist and a jaw!

  • Reply
    Larry Proffitt
    April 28, 2017 at 7:58 am

    All of these are common to us. I often wonder where in the world our people came up with these uses of words. Larry Proffitt

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