Appalachia Appalachian Dialect

Appalachian Vocabulary Test 41

Appalachian Vocabulary Test 41

It’s time for this month’s Appalachian Vocabulary Test-take it and see how you do!

  1. Talkingest
  2. Tad
  3. Twicet
  4. Tromp
  5. Tejus

Appalachian Vocabulary Test 41 2

 

  1. Talkingest: talkative. “I like to not have got away from him. I do believe he is the talkingest man I ever seen!”
  2. Tad: a small child; a small portion. “There was only a tad of milk left so I sent him to the store for some.”
  3. Twicet: twice. “I done told her twicet. She is not going to that party!”
  4. Tromp: stomp; to press down. “Somebody has tromped all over my clean floors with their muddy ole boots. And when I find out who it was I’m agonna tan their hide!”
  5. Tejus: tedious; nervous; anxious. “Aunt Flo used to do that take home work from Clifton. But it was so tejus it got on her nerves something awful and she had to quit.”

I hear all of this month’s words on a regular basis in my area of Appalachia. I use all of them myself except twicet. It’s still fairly common to hear folks add a ‘t’ to the end of their words here. Oncet for once is another one I hear often.

Hope you’ll leave me a comment and tell me how you did on the test.

Tipper

 

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65 Comments

  • Reply
    Charline
    April 21, 2012 at 12:57 am

    And ditto on R.B.’s comments on ‘argee’; my Dad said the same.

  • Reply
    Charline
    April 21, 2012 at 12:54 am

    I’m catching up with these posts after a pretty hectic month. Got ALL these great words right!

  • Reply
    Tipper
    April 14, 2012 at 9:04 am

    RB-I have heard both around these parts : ) And with my 2 girls there is lots of yammering and argeeing going on at this house : )
    Blind Pig The Acorn
    Celebrating and Preserving the
    Culture of Appalachia
    http://www.blindpigandtheacorn.com

  • Reply
    RB
    April 13, 2012 at 11:10 pm

    Heard ’em all but “tejus” (which I think in PLAIN English means tedious but am not sure).
    Now I’ve got a couple for you.
    A. Yammer: talkative, usually meaning in a senseless or meaningless way.
    “That man yammers all day long, and no one understands a single thing he says.”
    B. Argee: argue (and this seemed to be one of our dad’s favorites)
    “All you girls do is argee, argee, argee!”
    Have any of you heard of those?
    God bless.
    RB
    <><

  • Reply
    Nancy M.
    April 13, 2012 at 1:38 pm

    I hear and use most all of those at some point or other, except for the last one. It could be that I just haven’t heard it, though.

  • Reply
    Wanda in NoAla
    April 13, 2012 at 8:39 am

    My dad said ‘tejus’ all the time. Glad to learn it wasn’t just a local word. Love these tests!

  • Reply
    Madge @ The View From Right Here
    April 13, 2012 at 1:36 am

    So many of the words you feature are part of my vocabulary without knowing their from the mountains… my dad passed them on to me…

  • Reply
    Suzi Phillips
    April 12, 2012 at 9:17 pm

    Oh, my. I’m a goin’ way up north this summer & I’m startin’ to fear those Yankees won’t understand a word I say!

  • Reply
    Shirla
    April 12, 2012 at 9:08 pm

    I always come back and read the comments at the end of the day. Youins are sooo funny!
    Anyway, oncet and twicet has been running through my head all day and then it occured to me that Conway and Lorettie started one of their most popular songs with oncet. Or maybe I just followed along saying it different than they did. I will have to search for the song and listen closely to prove it to myself.
    Oncet-I made a promise that I would never lead you on…

  • Reply
    Ed Ammons
    April 12, 2012 at 6:46 pm

    B.Ruth-Are you shore you ain’t been a drankin more a that vaniller flaverin than yore a puttin in yore puddin?

  • Reply
    Larry Proffitt
    April 12, 2012 at 5:11 pm

    Thanks Tipper for this month’s test . We score a hundred here in the mountains of upper east Tennessee too. I taught my son in law not to tromp through the woods but to slip along through them but I had to make him FALL in behind me . Larry Proffitt

  • Reply
    Terri Hunter
    April 12, 2012 at 4:54 pm

    Love the list. I’m trying to educate my new Mississippi in-law so she and her husband can raise bilingual children, and the list is just perfect. I use tad and tromp frequently, and I knew tejus the minute I said it aloud. Keep up the good work!

  • Reply
    B. Ruth
    April 12, 2012 at 3:53 pm

    Tipper,
    I think we have tetched on somethin’…at leastways so fer the “bumblebknot” has linked up with the “thingamajig” and hooked up with the “intersetinettin’ button” so as to get this thang a’movin’. I was about to join “Roanie” on a tap of stump water if this didn’t work…It was gettin’ real “tejus”, “nervy” and “tetchy” evertime I tried
    to stob on the button!
    Have a goodin’ and thanks fer helpin’!!
    Also a great post Tipper,

  • Reply
    Don Casada
    April 12, 2012 at 3:42 pm

    I completely agree with B. Ruth – I suspect that a bunch of you’uns (at least those from this area) not only know, but use twicet. It is not pronounced like Tipper spelled it (as if there is a correct spelling).
    It is pronounced as twist, with the “i” being a long i (same pronunciation as in twice). It’s all said as one syllable.
    I think I’d be more apt to say twist in front of a word starting with a vowel, such as:
    He’s meaner’n sin and twist as ugly.
    But if it is followed by a consonant, twice would be used:
    He is twice the man I could ever hope to be.
    The “st” sound is used on the end of once – it is said like wonst, and also has but one syllable.

  • Reply
    Brenda Kay Ledford
    April 12, 2012 at 2:01 pm

    Oh, Tipper! Thanks for reminding me of these old-timey mountain terms. Our mountain languager is fast passing away. I had almost forgotten the meaning of these words.

  • Reply
    warren
    April 12, 2012 at 1:34 pm

    They are all very common here in WV too!

  • Reply
    Jim Casada
    April 12, 2012 at 12:57 pm

    Tipper–I’ll offer my comment on the Appalachian Vocabulary test, which, as always, I enjoyed. I’m quite familiar with all the words and regularly use four of the five. Like you, twicet is a word I recognize but don’t actually use personally. Along with Don, I use tad in ways other than as a noun, such as reckoning some folks over Brasstown way are a tad inclined to go fishing for free rather than obtaining the requisite license.
    I’ve been accused, more than once, of being the talkingest thing ever to come out of Swain County, although I have it on solid authority that Bill Burnett might be a rival in that regard. Late in life, Daddy accused me of having a tongue that wagged at both ends or being someone who could talk the ears off a Georgia mule. It is remotely possible that I incline towards being verbose, loquacious, garrulous, or wont to indulge in variegated verbal vagabondizing (like Don I’m attracted to alliteration). If so, I come by it in the most honest of fashions, because both Daddy and Grandpa Joe were mighty talkers when you got them in the right setting.
    One final thought–there are other superlatives similar to “talkingest.” One of the greatest outdoor books ever written uses the word “shootinest” to describe a great wingshot. It is Nash Buckingham’s “De Shootinest Gent’man.”
    Jim Casada
    http://www.jimcasadaoutdoors.com

  • Reply
    B. Ruth
    April 12, 2012 at 12:53 pm

    Tipper,
    I use them all and I think more people use twicest than they think….maybe the spelling of twicet sort of throwing them off ….
    We use oncet as well…and this here happened in my neck of the woods…
    Onest upon a spell thar wuz twicest as many nervy and tejus kin ’round hare….Theyus a’thinkin’
    that thar ‘panter wuz roamin’ about. Some of’em were the talkingest youever seed. Roanie a’spreadin’ most of hit….
    “Hit was jest a Bobcat tromping round about..on that thar tin top of the hen house, a’tryin’ ta git in makin’ that racket of a night.”
    Uncle Mason, said Aunt Roanie, I thunk had more than a tetch of
    stump water fer when I seed it, hit was only a tad bigger’n Limbs house cat…Shore skeered’em though!
    Thanks Tipper,
    I added a tad too much of vaniller to my batch instead of just a tetch…
    My bananer puddin’ tastes like vaniller puddin’….
    How’s the recipes goin’ for the cookin’ class this Spring?

  • Reply
    Jane
    April 12, 2012 at 12:26 pm

    I’ve heard tad and tromp, but not the others. I like to think there’s no right or wrong…just different. (though my senior English teacher, Mrs. Rice would be saying Wwhhaattt??}

  • Reply
    Charlotte
    April 12, 2012 at 11:43 am

    Passed the test this time, Tipper! These are fun!

  • Reply
    Alica
    April 12, 2012 at 11:15 am

    I’ve heard of talkingest. I’ve heard “tad” used in combination with “bit”…”I just need a tad bit more of that”. And oh yes, “Someone went tromping through my flower bed”. Once again, I enjoyed the vocabulary test! 🙂

  • Reply
    Ed Ammons
    April 12, 2012 at 10:56 am

    Cee-Consider the likely possibility that we are right and the rest of the world is wrong. Wooden bee the firstest ner the lastest time.

  • Reply
    NCMountainwoman
    April 12, 2012 at 10:04 am

    I knew all of these and used to hear them all the time when I was growing up. I don’t use any of them except “tad” every now and then.

  • Reply
    Kristina in TN
    April 12, 2012 at 9:57 am

    I’ve heard all of these words and even use a couple of them on occasion. When my family first came to the South 45 years ago one of the first local words we were introduced to was oncet. It came right after ya’ll! I thought it was strange at the time, but now it is music to my ears.

  • Reply
    kris
    April 12, 2012 at 9:48 am

    Well, I got the top two Tipper. Tad is still used in everyday talk in New Zealand, but the Kiwis have a funny accent!!!…K

  • Reply
    Kimberly Burnette
    April 12, 2012 at 9:40 am

    I know, use, and LOVE all of these words! I remember my grandmother using the word “tromp” all of the time in place of the word “stomp”. I also remember her describing HER grandmother using a loom and talking about her tromp, tromp, tromping on the treadles of the loom when she was weaving.

  • Reply
    Lonnie
    April 12, 2012 at 9:37 am

    I have heard and used all of those! I have to watch myself or I can still be caught adding a “t” to the end of “twice”!

  • Reply
    Ken
    April 12, 2012 at 9:33 am

    Tipper,
    I knew them all but the last one.
    And if anyone ever tore up the
    King’s language any more than my
    folks, I’d like to meet them.
    All of these Appalachian Word Tests are a lot of fun…Ken

  • Reply
    Sassy
    April 12, 2012 at 9:25 am

    Hey Tipper,
    I use Tad all the time, probaby cause I’m a tad, “small” myself.
    I also use tromp in the same way.
    Had used or heard the others though.
    Have a great day!

  • Reply
    amy jo phillips
    April 12, 2012 at 9:22 am

    I hearit all!! lol

  • Reply
    Canned Quilter
    April 12, 2012 at 9:22 am

    Have heard or used them all but twicet : )

  • Reply
    Jessie : Improved
    April 12, 2012 at 9:22 am

    I know them all but twicet. I still use tad and tromp, but I’m almost positive I used the others when younger.

  • Reply
    Ethelene Dyer Jones
    April 12, 2012 at 9:20 am

    “T” vocabulary words, right on!
    Knew them all; still use some!
    But seeing how widespread
    These sayings are known
    Makes me feel Appalachian culture’s
    Living on!
    Thanks!

  • Reply
    Miss Cindy
    April 12, 2012 at 9:17 am

    Tipper, I’ve heard them all but use tad and tromp the most. I’m kind of partial to that last word, tejus. It just seems to sooo adequately express it’s meaning. There is way too much tejus stuff in this world.
    There is another similar word, techus. I’m really not sure about the spelling but it means touchy. That woman shore is techus today.
    I know some really techus people and the word really fits the malady.

  • Reply
    Pat in east TN
    April 12, 2012 at 9:17 am

    All are familiar to me but #5. I hear/use the others often.

  • Reply
    Mike McLain
    April 12, 2012 at 9:08 am

    Didn’t recognize the spelling of tejus, but recognized as soon as I saw the usage. All the rest I got immediately.

  • Reply
    Ron Banks
    April 12, 2012 at 9:07 am

    Know all of them and use all but twicet and oncet. Another good one Tipper!

  • Reply
    Lise
    April 12, 2012 at 8:54 am

    I really enjoy your Appalachian vacabulary tests, rarely do I do very well, but it sure is helping me understand my neighbors and the people in town! Thanks for that:)

  • Reply
    Cee
    April 12, 2012 at 8:50 am

    I know and use all of those words except maybe “twicet”. I am always amazed when you point out words that I use on a regular basis and I realize that they are only used by Appalachian Folks. I have to laugh, I’ve talked this way so long I think its correct and the rest of the world is a little off.

  • Reply
    Shirla
    April 12, 2012 at 8:44 am

    All the words are used frequently around here. Where I come from, we are known to add a T to the end of words or simply drop a letter somewhere in the middle. My daughter had always heard me talk of a place called Beefide and laughed when she saw it spelled Beef Hide in a local paper. I heard a Louisville DJ making fun of the way we people from Pike County leave out the k, making it Pie County. He needs to know we also call him a dis jockey.

  • Reply
    Sue Crane
    April 12, 2012 at 8:44 am

    well I got a hunnerd on that test!!!

  • Reply
    Donna W
    April 12, 2012 at 8:41 am

    I’m familiar with every one of these. While working in the garden a couple days ago, I got to thinking about phrases my parents used to use: “He ain’t worth the powder it would take to blow him away.” “He ain’t worth a hill of beans.” “If brains were leather, he couldn’t saddle a flea.”
    I love the old sayings.

  • Reply
    Belva
    April 12, 2012 at 8:35 am

    I haven’t ever heard anyone use twicet here. The other ones I hear and use all the time. Some things are just not tedious, they are plain tejus!

  • Reply
    Carol Killian
    April 12, 2012 at 8:22 am

    Dear friend,
    I have heard all the vocabulary words and their uses.
    I enjoy being reminded of words..not sure I use any of them.. Happy Day!
    Carol

  • Reply
    dolores barton
    April 12, 2012 at 8:22 am

    Although I don’t hear the words used often, I was able to know the meaning and use of the first four. The last one got me! I’m learning!

  • Reply
    Uncle Al
    April 12, 2012 at 8:16 am

    Haven’t heard twicet either, but I use and hear others use a similar sounding – twicest – All the others are used regularly.

  • Reply
    John
    April 12, 2012 at 8:08 am

    I have heard them all. MY Mother when she wanted to get your attented she would start off by saying. well i well tell you strait up the stump.

  • Reply
    Bill Dotson
    April 12, 2012 at 8:07 am

    I have heard and used and still use all of them today here in the ohio valley.

  • Reply
    Bill Burnett
    April 12, 2012 at 8:03 am

    I’m familar with all but Tejus and in fact I’ve often been accused of being the talkinest but it’s a dag-nab lie, well maybe just a tad of truth resides in the accusation. However I try to make sure my brain’s loaded before I shoot my mouth off. Thanks Tipper for hooking me up with another cousin, C. Ron Perry. It shore nuff is a small world and growin smaller every day.

  • Reply
    Carol Isler
    April 12, 2012 at 8:03 am

    All perfectly acceptable words to use down here on the mill village. 🙂

  • Reply
    Jen
    April 12, 2012 at 7:59 am

    I use tad all the time. I knew tromp, but had never heard of the others. Thanks, Tipper!

  • Reply
    Richard Beauchamp
    April 12, 2012 at 7:52 am

    I am familiar with all the words in this test and have used them all. Have a good day !

  • Reply
    Don Casada
    April 12, 2012 at 7:50 am

    When used in reference to a wee young’un, I’m used to tadpole as opposed to tad. The dictionary may have it only as a noun, but it can also be used as an adjective, as in “Tipper is a tad touched” (sorry, I’m an awful advocate for the advancement of alliteration, even if it aggravates an angel 😉
    I love the little ditty “Life gets teejus, don’t it”. Doc Watson sings it at the link below.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jhHQgOjwCnQ
    I tried to find Walter Brennan’s version, but couldn’t.

  • Reply
    Marianne
    April 12, 2012 at 7:44 am

    Twicet I’ve not heard or used before, but the others are in most of our daily talk around here. We have a friend that we say is the talkenist person we know.. she laughs when we say this to her. I grew up hearing Tad used instead of dash in cooking especially. And I promise we have several in this household that tromp through with dirty shoes and of course everyone’s halo starts slipping and their devil horns start showin!

  • Reply
    Becky
    April 12, 2012 at 7:29 am

    I haven’t heard twicet and tejus before. But the others are common language where I come from.

  • Reply
    Mary Shipman
    April 12, 2012 at 7:27 am

    It’s getting a little tejus, that little tad is the talkingest boy and tromped down my bean rows twicet while telling his story.
    Don’t hear them near so often here in Missouri as I used too. Thanks Tipper, for the vocabulary test and some good memories.

  • Reply
    Karen Larsen
    April 12, 2012 at 7:19 am

    P.S. The word “tejus” comes from the Irish. They say that a lot..

  • Reply
    Karen Larsen
    April 12, 2012 at 7:19 am

    Here in south central PA, I do hear the word “twicet” (pronounced as one syllable) — maybe it’s a German thing. The other words make perfect sense to me, so I’d say I get an A on this test!

  • Reply
    Sheryl Paul
    April 12, 2012 at 7:17 am

    Use them all except Tejus, I’ve only heard that used instead of tedious. Tad I use daily.

  • Reply
    LINDA L. KERLIN
    April 12, 2012 at 7:17 am

    Well dear Tipper I did not now twicet or tejus—-just perhaps they did not get used this far north.

  • Reply
    Ethel
    April 12, 2012 at 7:17 am

    I regularly hear all but tejus, and use tad and tromp myself.

  • Reply
    kat
    April 12, 2012 at 7:11 am

    I not only have heard of them but I use them.

  • Reply
    Tim Mc
    April 12, 2012 at 6:15 am

    Each of these words are use quite often, except “twicet” don’t believe I’ve ever heard anyone use this one.

  • Reply
    MadSnapper
    April 12, 2012 at 6:03 am

    tromp and tad I use, the others have heard many years ago, but not in the past 50 years. i use just a tad almost every day

  • Reply
    Ed Ammons
    April 12, 2012 at 5:40 am

    I knowed ’em all and hear most of them regularly. I don’t use them often ’cause I’m not the talkenist person you’ve ever saw. You might be surprised at that revelation because of all I’ve to say on here, but it’s true. I like to see what I say before I say it. I let my fingers do the talking.
    So, is a tad twicet as much as a teeny bit and half a gob.

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