Appalachia Through My Eyes Appalachian Dialect

Appalachia Through My Eyes – I Come In A One

My life in appalachia I come in a one

The whole Blind Pig Gang gets together almost every Sunday afternoon to do a little pickin’ and grinnin’. Along with the music there’s lots of talking, sometimes a little debating, and always a lot of laughter.

The conversation subject matter changes as fast as the songs do and if you ain’t paying attention you can’t keep up with either one. Last Sunday my mind was slipping away when I realized all the kids had taken on Paul in debate. Whatever Paul had been talking about caused him to use the phrase “I come in a one of …”

According to the younger folks-they had never heard the phrase, thought it was crazy, and they claimed that it made absolutely no sense. I immediately sided with Paul saying “I’ve heard that all my life…and YOU TWO girls have heard it all your life too cause I say it!”

Once Paul and me sided together-those youngsters just caved. All three of them knew they’d never win the argument against our united front. At least that’s what I like to think happened. What actually happened was all three rolled their eyes at us and said “what-ever” pretty much in unison.

Even with the eye rolling…they’ll not forget the phrase I come in a one of…and that’s a good thing.

Tipper

Appalachia Through My Eyes – A series of photographs from my life in Southern Appalachia.

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26 Comments

  • Reply
    Tipper
    June 1, 2014 at 8:29 am

    Joyce-thank you for the comment! I like your meaning of the phrase : ) People who march to their own drums are fantastic-I live with a couple of them : ) Hope you have a great day!!!
    Tipper
    Blind Pig The
    Acorn
    Celebrating and Preserving the
    Culture of Appalachia
    http://www.blindpigandtheacorn.com

  • Reply
    Joyce Heishman
    June 1, 2014 at 8:14 am

    Why is it I feel I must always march to a different drum. The phrase of “I come in a one of …” meant (to me), “standing alone on a subject, but there are many standing behind me”. Just as you came along and joined Paul. Being brave enough to stand alone in what you believe in, knowing there are many who believe the same.I realize after reading all the other comments, my thoughts are alone, but I want to write my “2 cents worth”. Love your blog Tipper. Thanks Joyce

  • Reply
    lynn
    June 1, 2014 at 2:37 am

    never used that phrase.. but always love how you teach us how its supposed to be used … and where it began…
    have a great sunday…. sure loving the green and abundant colors around …
    big ladybug hugs
    lynnl

  • Reply
    Shirla
    May 31, 2014 at 11:06 pm

    Tipper, I’m beginning to think that phrase might be a Brasstown thing. We, like Howland, always said, “I come in a hair of slipping and falling.” I’ll practice saying it the way you do and see if anyone notices.

  • Reply
    RB
    May 31, 2014 at 10:31 pm

    Sorry, I have no idea what that phrase means.
    God bless.
    RB
    <><

  • Reply
    Ron Banks
    May 31, 2014 at 8:28 pm

    I have never heard of that one but I have heard I came in a hair of or a little more colorful, I came in a gnat’s a.. Of falling down those stairs.

  • Reply
    Eva Nell Mull Wike, PhD
    May 31, 2014 at 7:27 pm

    Well Tipper, I do believe Jim has got our computer back on track. I came in a hair giving up on him getting it fixed! Now I never heard the express ‘coming in a one’ before but it kind of makes sense.
    We had a wonderful BHReese celebration today. The ‘speaker’ was the best I have ever heard – telling bout his Uncle Byron Herbert Reese. A TV recording fellow was filming it. Maybe we can view it again!
    Eva Nell

  • Reply
    TimMc
    May 31, 2014 at 7:26 pm

    Hmm,, well, this is a new one on me also.. But I don’t you’d lost me in what you were talking about..

  • Reply
    Bob Aufdemberge
    May 31, 2014 at 5:41 pm

    Nearest thing to this that I recall in our area is folks saying things like “I came (or like as not I come) within one of gittin’ hit by a truck today.” Nobody ever explained one of what.

  • Reply
    Sheryl Paul
    May 31, 2014 at 4:49 pm

    My pig just came in at 2:45. I’ve come in a hair, an ounce, a sec of, but never a one of.

  • Reply
    Howland
    May 31, 2014 at 3:51 pm

    That’s new to me.
    “I come a ha’r a fallin’ down to the bottom o’ th’ gully, hadn’ been for a little oak saplin’ for t’ grab on to ’bout half ways….”
    Years later, I still “Come a ha’r” of doing stuff.”

  • Reply
    Tipper
    May 31, 2014 at 3:44 pm

    Tamela-thank you for the comments-and for searching for me! My own blind pig didn’t show up till after lunch today so something must be going on with Google and how its sending out its feeds. Hopefully they’ll soon correct the issue.
    Tipper
    Blind Pig The Acorn
    Celebrating and Preserving the
    Culture of Appalachia
    http://www.blindpigandtheacorn.com

  • Reply
    Miss Cindy
    May 31, 2014 at 3:39 pm

    Tipper, this is not an expression I know, at least not the way my brain is currently processing it. I’ll think on it. If you say it I’m certain I’ve heard it.

  • Reply
    Tipper
    May 31, 2014 at 3:33 pm

    Susan-thanks for the comment! Example: I come in a one of falling down the steps cause hed left his boots sitting right in the way!
    Blind Pig The Acorn
    Celebrating and Preserving the
    Culture of Appalachia
    http://www.blindpigandtheacorn.com

  • Reply
    Don Casada
    May 31, 2014 at 3:27 pm

    I’m with the girls – never heard it before. Like Ed Ammons, it’s “I came THAT close to…..”

  • Reply
    dolores
    May 31, 2014 at 3:15 pm

    Okay! I am not familar with that phrase unless it used to depict one of many or one of ten, etc. Hope the conversation slowed down and everyone was in good spirits. Sometimes those debates can be trouble.

  • Reply
    Ed Ammons
    May 31, 2014 at 2:50 pm

    I think I have figgered this one out. When I was a mean little kid, my mother would send me to do something and of course I would lolligag. After a couple of times reminding me she would give me a countdown. “you’ve got 5 seconds to get going or I’m gettin the switch, 5 — 4 — 3 — 2.”
    Just before she could say 1, I would skedaddle. Thus, I come in a one of…

  • Reply
    Jim Casada
    May 31, 2014 at 2:47 pm

    Tipper–No doubt to your chagrin and that of Paul, I’m going to have to side with the youngsters this time. That phrase is new to me. Maybe it is highly localized, although B. Ruth’s recognizing it suggests otherwise. It will be interesting to see whether it rings a bell with Don.
    Like others, my daily delivery of the blog has been decidedly sporadic of late. Today’s came at 2:41 p.m.
    Jim Casada

  • Reply
    Ed Ammons
    May 31, 2014 at 2:21 pm

    Iffen you fine folks that have trouble getting on this site would just bookmark (put in your favorites, etc) it, you can skip the email altogether. Just open the website and read the post then click on recent posts to see if there are any comments. It’s as easy as pie. (apple with vanilla ice cream)

  • Reply
    Ken Roper
    May 31, 2014 at 12:32 pm

    Tipper,
    I’ve said that very same thing, hundreds
    of times, especially when telling of an
    event.
    Had to get the Blind Pig today from the
    “Recent Post” on the right, but a lot of
    my other e-mails got thru…Ken

    • Reply
      SusieQ
      May 24, 2019 at 8:52 pm

      I’ve never heard “ I come in a one “…….but after reading all the comments , I am pert near caught between -standing alone on a subject -, and the meaning of the phrase if you were to say,” I come in a one of busting my knee when I stepped into that leaf covered hole near my sister’s yard .” Haha

  • Reply
    Ed Ammons
    May 31, 2014 at 11:11 am

    I don’t recall ever hearing the aforementioned phrase either. Is it something akin to “I came that close to….!” with the distance indicated but the thumb and forefinger? What ev er!

  • Reply
    Tamela
    May 31, 2014 at 10:05 am

    This phrase is a new one to me – please explain.
    By the way – I’m having to search for you on the web – not receiving the emails – but, as I’ve said before, it’s definitely worth the search.

  • Reply
    b. Ruth
    May 31, 2014 at 9:02 am

    Tipper,
    Do you mean; I come in a one of going barefoot over wearing shoes all summer.
    Or, I come in a one of makin’ a run of ice cream over puttin’ a watermelon in the creek for the picnic…
    Or, I come in a one of takin’ a nap in the lawnchair with my feet in the creek on a June afternoon, as going all the way to that city pool and smellin’ that stinky chlorine!
    Or, I’m one of eatin’ cornbread with pinto beans instead of biscuits and beans.
    And, I am a one of listenin’ and readin’ about the Blind Pig finding another real acorn as to havin’ to research in an ole wore out book some of our sayin’s….
    Thanks Tipper, have a great day!

  • Reply
    Susan Cook
    May 31, 2014 at 7:42 am

    Love to see that phrase in a sentence. Thanks.

  • Reply
    PinnacleCreek
    May 31, 2014 at 7:33 am

    These Appalachian sayings are like finding treasures. This expression used to be used a great deal, and it usually meant some type of small confrontation. example-I came in a one telling her to watch her mouth.

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