Appalachian Food Gardening

Pick You Some Purslane

How to eat purslane

Last summer Chatter learned about Purslane in a class she took at The John C. Campbell Folk School. She had the opportunity to eat some during the class and said she really liked the taste.

During the winter as Chatter and I were perusing this year’s Sow True Seed Catalog  we noticed they had purslane seed so we added it to our list. Chatter planted it back in May and it has really taken off.

Sow true seed purslane
We picked our first mess of purslane over the weekend. I think the stems are edible too, but we picked the leaves in the hope that it would help each plant continue to grow. After a quick wash in cold water I spread the leaves out and let them air dry.

Purslane and spinach salad
I mixed the purslane with the last of the spinach from the garden and made a dandy salad. As we ate supper Chatter and I looked at The Deer Hunter and Chitter to see if they noticed the purslane mixed into their salad-neither one said a word. Chatter and I agreed all our salads should have purslane in them now.

Purslane grows everywhere and is often considered a weed. You can find out more about the plant here. If you have experience with growing or eating purslane please share what you know with us.

Tipper

 

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21 Comments

  • Reply
    Maggie Roberts
    May 30, 2017 at 10:31 am

    I grew some this spring, but did not really care for it. Also I picked only the leaves as well, but so far just have bare stems left!

  • Reply
    Marilyn Blake
    June 12, 2016 at 3:20 pm

    Portulaca [first comment] is different. It has a similar appearance, but the leaves are smaller and it has little rose shaped flowers most of the summer. Portulaca is also edible.
    We do not really appreciate the texture of purslane [mucilaginous]. Here’s an interesting note- the chickens prefer lettuce and many other greens, but will peck at purslane if it is the only offering.

  • Reply
    Rev. Rose Marie "RB" Redmond
    June 6, 2016 at 10:16 pm

    We call it porchelacca (sp?) here. I grow it every year in hanging pots. Once it even reseeded itself and came up again the following Spring in the astroturf on the deck below the hanging pots.
    I wonder what it tastes like, and if it has any homeopathic qualities?
    God bless.
    RB
    <><

  • Reply
    Helene Kasenko
    June 6, 2016 at 10:10 pm

    I’ve been eating purslane for years. For the past few years, I’ve blanched and frozen it for use in stews and soups in winter. According to medicinal herbalists, it is highly nutritious and healing.

  • Reply
    Alica
    June 6, 2016 at 7:27 pm

    We call this Pig Weed…I’m not sure why, but it invades my garden every year! My Italian neighbor told me that she has eaten it, but I’ve never tried it! Maybe I should! If I would consider it something to be cultivated instead of weeded, my frustrations would be so much less! 🙂

  • Reply
    David Templeton
    June 6, 2016 at 4:40 pm

    I never knew of purslane as edible. In my Indiana garden it was a real nuisance; almost impossible to get rid of it. I guess next time I’ll let it grow and eat it. Of course, here in my new Tennessee garden, from new ground, it’ll be a while before I see purslane (I hope!).

  • Reply
    Tom
    June 6, 2016 at 3:37 pm

    Have seen it at a local farmer’s market but have never tried it. After looking at your salad it seems we better try it, it looks delicious! Glad Chatter stumbled upon this, thanks for sharing.

  • Reply
    Ken
    June 6, 2016 at 1:17 pm

    Tipper,
    Just leave it up to the youngin’s to show us “old foggies” something new to eat. But what do I know: I use to eat Dirt! I ain’t never ate it but I’ve seen that stuff growing somewhere. It sure looks tasty in a salad! I’d probably like it too cause I do like most greenery things…Ken

  • Reply
    Ron Stephens
    June 6, 2016 at 12:38 pm

    I do not recall us eating purslane asgreens but then I do not remember each of the plants we picked. I remember the purslane in your photo growing in the garden and corn field. It had a red flower. I always thought it a pretty plant. I have what I think is a small purslane in the garden but it is too tiny and low-growing to be a practical edible.
    I think I”ve posted this more than once but I am a hunter-gatherer. I like to find and collect useful or decorative ‘stuff’ from nature which of course can become being a pack rat. But using wild edibles puts us in touch with our ancestors who had to supplement their gardens and fields and orchards with wild foodstuffs to.

  • Reply
    Ed Ammons
    June 6, 2016 at 11:38 am

    My daddy knew about purslane when I was growing 60 years ago. Our family ate it sometimes. Daddy sauteed it. The tender stalks as well as the leaves. I wouldn’t eat anything green at that time, so if I ate it I don’t remember it . It is also called pigweed. Pigs love it. It was so abundant on Wiggins Creek that we had plenty for human pigs and the porcine ones too.
    We also called it pusley.

  • Reply
    PinnacleCreek
    June 6, 2016 at 9:18 am

    I had purchased a book on wild edible food, and realized the weed I had almost completely fought out of my garden was probably purslane. Their picture was not as clear as yours, so now I know for certain what purslane really looks like I am surprised this was not among the wild greens we used to pick. I sure miss the camaraderie when Mom and neighbors would gather wild greens around the edge of the woods. They were so tasty served with a big pan of cornbread. I can still taste those greens Mom actually cooked down and then fried in bacon grease.
    Once worked with a lady who used to jokingly tell those who were feeling poorly, ”What you need is a mess of lettuce and onion.” I tend to think wild greens are the cure for what ails you. They are definitely a spirit lifter–minus that great bacon grease.

  • Reply
    anita griffith
    June 6, 2016 at 8:58 am

    Always heard it called puslee or purslee.If it comes back again this year I’ll try adding it to a salad.
    LG

  • Reply
    Quinn
    June 6, 2016 at 8:38 am

    I’ve never eaten purslane but next time I see it, I’ll try it. Pretty common here.
    Now, if someone would only come up with a use for broadleaf plantain…I’m knee-deep in it already, and the goats don’t eat much of it. If they would, I’d save a little on hay!

  • Reply
    Jim Casada
    June 6, 2016 at 8:18 am

    Tipper—I’ve never eaten purslane but I’ve spent many a back-bending minute weeding the stuff. I’ve known it was edible but never bothered to try it. Guess I’ll have to have an attitude adjustment and see if it tickles my palate.
    Jim Casada

  • Reply
    b. Ruth
    June 6, 2016 at 7:50 am

    Tipper,
    After the rain last night, I decided to do a walk through the garden before dark. I pulled a weed or two that I could reach with out stepping in the wet dirt. Right there growing proud as anything on the edge of the raised bed rail was a clump of purslane! I started to pull it out! I don’t know why I left it there, when I could have plucked it out so easy right there in front of my squash plants, but I did….
    Then low and behold…your post today….”Pick You Some Purslane!” How strange I thought!
    After the ground dries a bit, I’m going back to that clump of Purslane, I am sure the rain we made a bigger, greener and tastier clump by this morning….
    Thanks Tipper,
    PS…We had some sautéed squash Saturday for supper! Can’t wait for enough, only need two, zucchini for a zucchini, onion, tomato, mozzarella cheese casserole…love them fixed that way!

  • Reply
    Miss Cindy
    June 6, 2016 at 7:49 am

    I would probably like purslane, I haven’t met too many greens that I didn’t like. I looked at the bigger picture in the link but don’t recognizing it so I’m guessing I’ve never eaten it unless it was in a salad in a restaurant. I will have to pay more attention outside and see if I can find some to try!

  • Reply
    Sheryl Paul
    June 6, 2016 at 7:17 am

    I have used purslane in my salad for a few years now. I only have one source even though it grows everywhere, N9 way of knowing what has been put on it.

  • Reply
    Sheryl Paul
    June 6, 2016 at 7:17 am

    I have used purslane in my salad for a few years now. I only have one source even though it grows everywhere, N9 way of knowing what has been put on it.

  • Reply
    Sheryl Paul
    June 6, 2016 at 7:17 am

    I have used purslane in my salad for a few years now. I only have one source even though it grows everywhere, N9 way of knowing what has been put on it.

  • Reply
    Sheryl Paul
    June 6, 2016 at 7:17 am

    I have used purslane in my salad for a few years now. I only have one source even though it grows everywhere, N9 way of knowing what has been put on it.

  • Reply
    Ethelene Dyer Jones
    June 6, 2016 at 7:07 am

    You’ve taught me about Purslane. I saw it on our farm, but as I recall, we didn’t eat it. I’m glad to kow it is edible and good in a salad!

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