Appalachia Overheard

Overheard

Overheard-in-Appalachia

“I’ll beat you like a dusty rug.”

Tipper

Overheard: snippets of conversation I overhear in Southern Appalachia

 

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20 Comments

  • Reply
    Tipper
    May 24, 2016 at 4:14 pm

    Sherry-thank you for the great comment and YES my kids have exasperated me like that many many times : ) 

  • Reply
    Rev. Rose Marie "RB" Redmond
    May 21, 2016 at 9:22 pm

    Yep, I think I may have heard that saying before.
    Our mother had a large blue throw rug in her bedroom when we lived in the city. To clean it, she’d toss it over a clothesline and beat it with a broom. When we moved to the country, she found an actual rug beater in the rafters of the basement. Then we used that to beat her rug clean.
    God bless.
    RB
    <><

  • Reply
    Ken Roper
    May 21, 2016 at 5:31 pm

    Tipper,
    I hope you, Chitter and Chatter had a nice time in Stecoah today. Those folks got to see and hear Our Mountain Girls playing and singing country and gospel songs. Next Sunday evening will be our turn, can’t wait to see you all at Valleytown Baptist at 6:00…Ken

  • Reply
    Sherry
    May 21, 2016 at 2:56 pm

    I’ve been told to “go get a hickory” though. And I have used ” I’m gonna beat the living daylights out of you.” While driving down the road with a couple of my kids one day. they were starting to fuss and I was trying to drive and I yelled at them as hard as I could and said, ” I’m gonna give you 50 noodles with a wet lash!” Laughter erupted as I realized what I had shouted and we all were laughing so hard I had to pull off the road. Kids ever exasperate anyone else like that?

  • Reply
    Bill Burnett
    May 21, 2016 at 2:38 pm

    One of my favorites is “I’ll beat you like a borrowed Bird Dog.”

  • Reply
    TimMc
    May 21, 2016 at 1:39 pm

    I Wouldn’t want to be on the receiving end of that one…

  • Reply
    Ann Applegarth
    May 21, 2016 at 1:03 pm

    Never heard that one, but the one I did hear a lot was “I’ll beat you black and blue.’

  • Reply
    Sue Crane
    May 21, 2016 at 12:17 pm

    You knew you were in BIG trouble when my grandmother said “I’m gonna get me a keen hickory withe and cut the blood out of you”. She never did but she sure could make you dance!

  • Reply
    Ed Ammons
    May 21, 2016 at 12:02 pm

    OK, then what you gonna do?

  • Reply
    Chuck Howell
    May 21, 2016 at 11:59 am

    “Goin Like a F–t in a Whirlwind.” “I’ll Maller yer head into Mincemeat.” I hadn’t heard “Stop Pestering Me” until my daughter returned from UNC this week. Guess she got some “Learnin” from them Tarheels. In California it’s “Bitchin,” “Groovy” etc.

  • Reply
    Ethelene Dyer Jones
    May 21, 2016 at 10:53 am

    I didn’t hear “I’ll beat you like a dusty rag.” But I’m familiar with all the ones Anita Griffith wrote. Another was “I’ll beat you ’till the cows come home!” Which, of course, might be a long type of punishment, because we usually had to “go after” the cows in the far grazing pasture and drive them to the barn for additional feeding, and of course milking in the late evenings. I think the threat of punishment in Appalachia often far exceeded the actual implementation of it. I didn’t see much abuse from punishment going on; but I did see obedient and respectful children to parents! And maybe that’s why the threats were so overwhelming; they didn’t have to be carried out!

  • Reply
    Wanda Devers
    May 21, 2016 at 9:57 am

    “I’ll give you what Paddy gave the drum!”

  • Reply
    Ron Banks
    May 21, 2016 at 9:54 am

    I haven’t heard that one. But here are some I’m familiar with.
    I’ll beat the tar out of you, I’ll beat the stuffings out of you, I’ll beat the soup out of you, I’ll stomp a mud hole in you, I’ll slap you cross eyed, I’ll stomp the flitter out of you and I’ll drop you like a bad transmission.

  • Reply
    Ron Banks
    May 21, 2016 at 9:53 am

    I haven’t heard that one. But here are some I’m familiar with.
    I’ll beat the tar out of you, I’ll beat the stuffings out of you, I’ll beat the soup out of you, I’ll stomp a mud hole in you, I’ll slap you cross eyed, I’ll stomp the flitter out of you and I’ll drop you like a bad transmission.

  • Reply
    b. Ruth
    May 21, 2016 at 9:10 am

    Tipper,
    I remember gathering up all the scatter rugs! Before running the old Electrolux vacuum, it was my job to “shake the rugs”, vacuum and sweep the kitchen!
    However, l remember my Mother helping carry outside, a large carpet-like rug at my grandmothers. They “beat the dickens” out of it with a broom and a wire wooden handled rug beater! Back then all they used was a long-handled rolling brush sweeper for daily use!
    I’d say I use, when I would have to make a (un-kept) threat,” I’ll “beat the dickens out of you”, if you slam that door one more time!”
    Thanks Tipper…. loved this one,
    memories, memories…
    Did you ever get a “snoot full” of dust… when shaking a rug?…ewwww

  • Reply
    Dolores
    May 21, 2016 at 9:06 am

    I haven’t heard that one, but I did get a laugh out of some of the early responses. Good way to start my day!

  • Reply
    Ron Stephens
    May 21, 2016 at 8:45 am

    Ah yes, I remember the core of beating the rugs. Anybody who took a beating like a dusty rug would be throughly lambasted. Guess it was a dry version of the battling sticks on the wet wash. Us boys got the chore because we liked to hit things I suppose.

  • Reply
    anita griffith
    May 21, 2016 at 8:14 am

    Never heard that one.The most common I’ve heard are I’ll beat the devil out of you,I’ll beat the tar out of you,and my favorite one is, i’ll beat the living daylights out of you.
    another I just thought of is,I’ll beat you till your mama don’t
    recognize you.
    E.KY. LG

  • Reply
    Jackie
    May 21, 2016 at 7:50 am

    I heard a female police officer tell a male criminal, “You answer this officer’s questions or I’ll beat you worse than your mama ever did.”

  • Reply
    Miss Cindy
    May 21, 2016 at 7:10 am

    Tip, I have no idea what a dusty rug is, of course, other than the unvacuumed one in my living room.

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