Appalachian Dialect

Appalachian Vocabulary Test 123

Mule

It’s time for this month’s Appalachian Vocabulary Test.

I’m sharing a few videos to let you hear the words and phrases. To start the videos click on them.

 

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1. Yanway: that way. “I saw him throw the ball over yanway, but we’ve been a looking for almost a hour and ain’t found it yet.”

 

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2. Yon: yonder; that way. “They’ve built a new road up there just past the barn. It goes yon way all the way to the top of the mountain.”

 

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3. Yuns: all of you. “Yuns should a knowed better! I can’t believe you sit right here and let this happen.”

 

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4. Yuns come: come again. “Yuns come as soon as you get the chance, Momma’s been a missing you for a good long time.”

 

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5. Yieldy: productive land. “I’m telling you that land is yieldy! He grows more in that small patch than most people do in a big garden.”

All of this month’s words are beyond common to me except yieldy, I’ve never heard it used.

Hope you’ll leave a comment and let me know how you did on the test.

Tipper

Appalachian Cooking Class details

Come cook with me!

MOUNTAIN FLAVORS – TRADITIONAL APPALACHIAN COOKING
Location: John C. Campbell Folk School – Brasstown, NC
Date: Sunday, June 23 – Saturday, June 29, 2019
Instructors: Carolyn Anderson, Tipper Pressley

Experience the traditional Appalachian method of cooking, putting up, and preserving the bounty from nature’s garden. Receive hands-on training to make and process a variety of jellies, jams, and pickles for winter eating. You’ll also learn the importance of dessert in Appalachian culture and discover how to easily make the fanciest of traditional cakes. Completing this week of cultural foods, a day of bread making will produce biscuits and cornbread. All levels welcome.

Along with all that goodness Carolyn and I have planned a couple of field trips to allow students to see how local folks produce food for their families. The Folk School offers scholarships you can go here to find out more about them. For the rest of the class details go here.

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18 Comments

  • Reply
    Dee
    April 27, 2019 at 12:39 pm

    Never heard Yieldy but I did hear yonder as he lives over yonder with the speaker pointing the way. I always heard “you all” come back and stay with us. When we moved here to south central PA and met a neighbor that had just moved to our area, she said why don’t “you’uns” come over to our house for supper. I had never heard that expression and when I asked where they were from she said they were born and raised just a little south of Pittsburgh.

  • Reply
    Yecedrah Beth Higman
    April 26, 2019 at 7:38 pm

    I too, have heard all but yieldy! We grew up saying all the other words. They were and still are used by me and the folks I grew up with in Arkansas.

  • Reply
    Becky
    April 26, 2019 at 1:21 pm

    100% on this one….

  • Reply
    Ron Banks
    April 26, 2019 at 12:33 pm

    I don’t think I’ve heard yieldy but I’m familiar with the rest of them.
    Yun’s come on in the house and we’ll hunt up a bean to cook! Yun’s come back when you can stay longer! I heard my daddy say that many times.

  • Reply
    Ann Applegarth
    April 26, 2019 at 9:19 am

    You’uns, definitely, although I have always said, “Y’all.” The others I hadn’t heard.

  • Reply
    Shirl
    April 26, 2019 at 9:06 am

    I don’t recall ever hearing yieldy used to describe a patch of ground. Mom would probably have said, “I raised a right smart in that small patch.” Yander was the word we used instead of yonder. Not sure if I ever heard yanway either. I didn’t do nary bit of good on today’s test.

  • Reply
    Ron Stephens
    April 26, 2019 at 8:48 am

    Of them all, I am most familiar with “yonway” with “yanway” a rarely heard variant with the same meaning. I’m hazy about “you’uns” and its variations. I think maybe I just fold it in with “you all” so I don’t note the difference if and when I hear it. Pretty sure I have never heard “yieldy” just other terms with the same idea.

    What your tests have taught me is that I don’t ‘hear’ separately the words I know the meaning of. And that means I can’t judge how much of an old-time Appalachianer I am. I’m guessing about a 3 out of 5……

  • Reply
    Ed Ammons
    April 26, 2019 at 8:37 am

    Paul’s wrong! Andrews is this side of Marble. Murphy’s on yon side! I ‘spect it’s all in where you’re comin frum though.

  • Reply
    aw griff
    April 26, 2019 at 8:36 am

    I don’t know yieldy and I don’t have yieldy ground. My ground is poor and always needs extra work to be yieldy.
    I hear yonways instead of yanway.
    I hear y’all more now than I did yrs, ago. I think tv has told us that is what we are supposed to say. Growing up it was you all or youins.

  • Reply
    Eldonna Ashley
    April 26, 2019 at 8:18 am

    I am familiar with all but yieldy but I would have understood it if I heard it. As for yuns I heard it all the time. I was not allowed to use the word, my momma forbade it’s use. I am not sure why she was so dead set against it. Y’all was allowed but not usual in my neck of the woods.

  • Reply
    b. Ruth
    April 26, 2019 at 8:13 am

    Tipper,
    You’uns is the way we spelt hit! Yeildy ain’t heard much in our neck of the woods…All the others we hear often.

    Rainy morning here in E. TN…How’s everything over the mountain? Not much garden planted so far…Running behind, hangin’ on to a coat-tail!

    Always love these tests…lol
    Thanks Tipper,
    I read more than I get to comment these days…but I’m here in the background so keep up the good work! Thanks for all you do!

  • Reply
    Gayle Larson
    April 26, 2019 at 7:47 am

    Yieldy is new to me but the others, like you, I have used or heard.

  • Reply
    Don Byers
    April 26, 2019 at 7:12 am

    Mommer an ’em stay over yonway.

  • Reply
    Jim Casada
    April 26, 2019 at 7:00 am

    Tipper–Like you, yieldy is new to me. The others are common as pig tracks, although I hear yander about as much as yonder and would render it you’uns in print rather than yuns.
    Jim Casada

  • Reply
    Bill Burnett
    April 26, 2019 at 6:58 am

    I too am familiar with all but yieldy. Often hear land as being “Rich” of “Poor” or having a good yield or a sorry yield but never have heard “Yieldy” used.

  • Reply
    Sheryl Paul
    April 26, 2019 at 6:28 am

    Yon, yonder. Yonway all familiar and used except yonway
    Yeilfu is new to me. Yins I have heard, but more from people in the Ohoo area.odd

  • Reply
    Miss Cindy
    April 26, 2019 at 6:08 am

    Yieldy is not a word that I have heard before, the rest I am quite familiar with. I just love how we make out own vocabulary as the need arises!

    • Reply
      Terry L Stites
      April 26, 2019 at 8:29 am

      All great words. Yieldy is a new one for me. Is there a vocabulary video that will let me hear how you say Appalachia? I’m from Oklahoma, we do use a lot of the same words you all do. I just don’t want to sound ignorant.

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