Appalachia Appalachia Through My Eyes

Appalachia Through My Eyes – Nurses in Training

my life in appalachia nurses in training

 

Students working hard to better the lives of their families and ours.

Tipper

Appalachia Through My Eyes – A series of photographs from my life in Southern Appalachia.

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8 Comments

  • Reply
    Sherry
    April 9, 2017 at 9:44 pm

    My mother was the oldest of 8 siblings and had to drop out of school and help at home. Her family moved to Oak Ridge, Tn. during WW2 and she worked at the plants there. When I was 15 she went back to school and became an LPN, worked at the hospital there for years. When we moved to Fl. she worked at the hospital here and then in doctor’s offices and actually managed one of the offices. It was so great to be able to call her from wherever I was to get medical advice for my children! She was such a blessing. One of our daughter’s is a CNA and she loves to do hospice work and be with folks right before they step into heaven! She has so many stories of that very thing and even sings them into heaven or prays with them so they can go to heaven! What a wonderful ministry. Angels on earth.

  • Reply
    TimMc
    April 9, 2017 at 6:32 pm

    Words can not describe the gratitude our family feels to those who have taken on this occupation, with our Daughters health issues we have met some of the most wonderful people who wear the white uniform, may God bless each and everyone of them in their unselfish, hard working, dedicated jobs.

  • Reply
    Ed Ammons
    April 9, 2017 at 12:09 am

    My neighbor Jennifer is a nurse. She and Jeremy had two children, Matthew and Brooke. Matthew is about 20 now and Brooke about 14. Jeremy was a stay at home dad. He looked after the kids and looked after the house. In fact he built the house they lived in. Jennifer was the one who brought home the money. Jeremy coached his children in community and school sports. Jeremy coached everybodys children in community and school sports. Jeremy was devoted to Jennifer and his children. All his children.
    Jeremy and Matthew were heavy into motorcycles and Brooke too but she was too little to ride. Back September of 2014, Jeremy, Matthew and Brooke went to Steele Creek to practice on a track where they were going to ride. Brooke had a camera and was recording her dad and brother. Matthew and Jeremy were on the track with Matthew out ahead. Jeremy went over a jump and when he came down the suspension broke.He landed on his chest on the front forks. Matthew didn’t know anything had happened until he finished the lap and came back around to where his dad lay. He tried to do CPR but his father died before the EMTs could get to him.
    Jeremy was a nice looking young man with a smile and a wave for everyone who passed by. Jennifer was a nice looking young woman with a smile and a wave for everyone who passed by. Now there is no Jeremy and if we are lucky enough to see Jennifer, we see only a ghost of what she used to be. Somebody started a go-fund-me page in the internet with a goal on $10,000. It didn’t raise $10,000, it raised almost $12,000. That was in addition to all the gifts by friends, neighbors and family.
    It seems ironic that Jennifer chose a profession whose goal is to relieve pain and suffering and then lost her husband at such an early age.

  • Reply
    Dee Parks
    April 8, 2017 at 6:46 pm

    I have met so many wonderful Nurses!! They are very special people and have such a demanding serious job. My husband got sick one year on our way back from vacation and we ended up at the emergency room in Tupelo, MS. They found a blood clot had gone through his heart and exploded into tiny clots going into both lungs. The doctor and Nurses were really wonderful and within a week they had him where I could take him to our son’s home with oxygen and then on home. We sent back thank you cards to the set of Nurses that took care of him and the doctor too.

  • Reply
    Ken
    April 8, 2017 at 11:41 am

    Tipper,
    In January of 2015 I had my eyes fixed at our local hospital. I had heard many bad things that went on there, but I was treated as nice as you could ask for. The nurses were nice and courteous, as well as the Technicians and Doctors that tended to me. I had Cataract Surgery, one week behind the other, and now I can see like a six year old boy.
    Of course you can hear all kinds of things about institutions. Some of my friends when I was in school warned of bad things, but they were all wrong. I loved all my teachers. Guess you should check them out yourselves and the nurses in hospitals are the ones that do most of the work. …Ken

  • Reply
    Ann Applegarth
    April 8, 2017 at 10:21 am

    There’s a shortage of these “angels of mercy” in New Mexico. I hope there isn’t in Appalachia!

  • Reply
    Ron Stephens
    April 8, 2017 at 9:37 am

    My Mom was in the US Cadet Nurse Corp in 1944-45. It was a federal program designed to alleviate an anticipated shortage of nurse as the more experienced ones were moved to forward hospitals. She left the program the day after VJ Day to go to work for the doctor in her hometown and help support her widowed mother. But she was always a nurse by nature though she never qualified officially as an LPN. Nurses by nature are exceptional people.

  • Reply
    Ron Banks
    April 8, 2017 at 9:31 am

    It seems I sort of grew up around the hospital environment. Mom worked at the hospital and dad did as well after he got out of the gas station business. I even worked the in the physical therapy department during high school and was actually considering being a therapist as a career choice but I ended up in the water utility business by a fluke and stayed there 30 plus years. Although I left the hospital environment I did finally marry a nurse so once again I was in familiar territory. She has been a L&D nurse for 25 years so I have heard lots of baby stories and probably know more about birthing babies than I should.
    Nurses are special people who work hard and long hours to care for people who are not always easy to care for. My hat is off to all of them for all they do.

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