Appalachia

Want A Subscription To The Foxfire Magazine – I’ve Got One To Giveaway

Foxfire Museum Harold Garrison

As I told you yesterday, I thoroughly enjoyed my visit to the Foxfire Museum. I loved talking with the folks who work there and seeing the artifacts was truly fascinating. But there was one thing from the day that stood out above the rest.

Foxfire Museum Aunt Airie

Sitting on the porch talking to Joyce Green made me feel like I’d met up with an old friend. We seemed to have many things in common-and even our parents seemed to share some of the same quirks.

It was something Joyce said that stuck with me from that day. She said over the years she’s been involved with the Foxfire Program more than one person has asked her “What will you do when all the old folks are gone?”

With a knowing smile she told me “I tell them there’ll always be old folks. As some pass on others take their place.” Joyce went on to point out-those first Foxfire books have come full circle. Someone considered an old timer today-may have learned a traditional skill from one of those first books and may have since shared it with their children-their family-their friends. In other words they’re continuing the tradition.

Many old time ways have gone by the wayside-but since I started the Blind Pig I’ve discovered there are also many old time ways that are alive and well. One that quickly comes to mind is pickling in crocks.

After a lady at work tasted The Deer Hunter’s pickled beans and corn, she asked me if she could buy a jar for her son for Christmas. She said “I’ve asked and asked and no one where I live remembers how to make it like that.” I told her she could have a jar for her son. And then I told her something even better-she could learn to make them herself-because we could show her how.

So I guess you could say my favorite thing from my day spent at the Foxfire Museum-was hope. I know traditions and techniques from days gone by are alive and well in these Appalachian mountains where I live and I have a hope that they’ll continue to be passed along to the next generation too.

——————-

Now for the magazine subscription. The Foxfire Magazine is published twice a year-typically January and June-since those months fit well with the school year. You can click here to jump over and check out the magazine for yourself-its very affordable. *Giveaway has ended.

Tipper

p.s. The photos in this post were taken at The Foxfire Museum.

 

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98 Comments

  • Reply
    Kim Campbell
    February 25, 2012 at 3:11 pm

    This is awesome! I am going to get a few back issues!! (I realize I am too late for the contest) 🙂

  • Reply
    Liz P
    February 25, 2012 at 10:16 am

    I love your website, so much information, memories and other great stuff.

  • Reply
    susie swanson
    February 21, 2012 at 6:31 pm

    I’ve read a lot of those books, I got them from the Bookmobile and I love them.

  • Reply
    April Chase
    February 20, 2012 at 5:05 pm

    I would love to have a subscription to the magazine – the books are some of my favorites and I read them often. Thanks for the giveaway!

  • Reply
    Stefanie
    February 20, 2012 at 1:52 pm

    I have some of the books – Foxfire is what brought my family to these mountains 25 years ago, and I still learn new things from the books and from my community. I love to try “new to me” skills every year. I’d love to have a subscription to the magazine.

  • Reply
    Marcia Campbell
    February 20, 2012 at 8:21 am

    Have been aware of the Foxfire project for many, many years and would love a subscription!

  • Reply
    Terri T.
    February 19, 2012 at 1:06 pm

    I would adore a subscription to Foxfire Magazine. I have a dozen or more of the Foxfire books.
    I am elated to find this website!

  • Reply
    Becky
    February 19, 2012 at 11:09 am

    I personally love the fact that you post how-to’s here because there are some things I’ve never seen done before and hope to try them. And all I have to do is click back here to get the step by step directions.
    And I would love a subscription to Foxfire Magazine.

  • Reply
    Lisa Q
    February 19, 2012 at 9:09 am

    My husband’s family is from N. Ga and deeply rooted in the mtns. We love the Foxfire books and try to teach our children much of the history of Appalachia. Would love the magazine.
    Lisa Q
    [email protected]

  • Reply
    Sandy Satterfield
    February 19, 2012 at 8:57 am

    Tip- I have the first sixs books, still like to read them

  • Reply
    Judy Mincey
    February 19, 2012 at 7:03 am

    As a Sacred Harp singer, I am constantly reminded of the importance of “walking in the old paths.” We, of course, become the “old folks” and are responsible for the continuation of our beloved traditions be they music, food or lifestyle.Keep up the good work, Tipper.

  • Reply
    Sherry Whitaker
    February 18, 2012 at 8:48 pm

    Oh, I love the Foxfire books. My Dad and Mom have a set and I have been given a few…my sister, Charline gave me one about the different religions/churches/beliefs, etc.since we are in the ministry. I wouldn’t take anything for it and will get a whole set one of these days and would love to have a subscription to the magazine. Our family is from Rabun Co. Ga. area! We planted a huge garden at the church we pastored in Indiana and I learned to can and now I have made my first quilt by hand!…so perhaps I will have something to pass on…

  • Reply
    Wayne Newton
    February 18, 2012 at 8:14 pm

    It must have been 1990 or ’91, when I was lucky enough to acquire a complete set of the Foxfire books.
    I read ’em ,used ’em, loaned ’em, and then I donated the entire set to a Hope House library in South Georgia.
    I hope they each found a user and a loaner who has continued to pass ’em around.
    Only those who have perused those pages can imagine the wealth of knowledge found therein.
    I was fortunate to pass by the Foxfire office in the 1970s, and stopped by 2 or 3 times.
    Thanks for the memories, Tipper.

  • Reply
    RB
    February 18, 2012 at 8:05 pm

    I’d love to have a subscription to the magazine.
    God bless.
    RB
    <><

  • Reply
    RB
    February 18, 2012 at 8:05 pm

    I love the part where Joyce says, “I tell them there’ll always be old folks. As some pass on others take their place.”
    That is indeed true. Praise God!!!
    Now for us all to remember that and teach the children the way our parents and their parents, and theirs before that taught us – because one day it may make the difference between their survival and demise should a world-wide natural disaster occur.
    Don’t you think?
    God bless.
    RB
    <><

  • Reply
    Charline
    February 18, 2012 at 6:23 pm

    Oh, and thanks, Suzi for the verse- I’ve been told that my great-grandmother would do this for folks.

  • Reply
    Charline
    February 18, 2012 at 6:17 pm

    I loved your post about Foxfire and the museum, which I had the privilege to visit a few years back, during a family reunion. I started collecting the books (or rather my parents did, and I continued) in the early years and have gotten some of the newer ones, too. Warning: do NOT lend them out, unless you intend on replacing them! Right now, it looks as though vol. 3 is missing :(. It would be nice to get the magazine, too.

  • Reply
    nancy
    February 18, 2012 at 10:47 am

    I love the Foxfire books, read them over and over. I do hope that there will always be old timers to pass on the knowledge that was shared in these books. Well I guess not just in books as we have your blog.

  • Reply
    Diane Walter
    February 18, 2012 at 10:31 am

    BTW, thanks for the chance to win this subscription. I’m so excited to find something fun/practical/and sentimental that I could give as gifts this year…Already have several people in mind.

  • Reply
    Diane Walter
    February 18, 2012 at 10:27 am

    I’ve never heard of these but would love to own my own. I have deep roots in West Virgina and a deep love and respect for all of the applachia folks, but I live in the city so need all the help I can get. I got information on the internet to make my own sauerkraut, but not sure which info I can trust…Most of my family that would know are no longer with us.

  • Reply
    Jen Y
    February 18, 2012 at 10:25 am

    I’d love to have a subscription, I didn’t even know they had one. I have all the books & love them. And yes, I know a lot of young people who do things the ‘old’ ways still too.

  • Reply
    Patty Hall
    February 18, 2012 at 7:30 am

    Tipper, reading your posts and the comments makes me long for the ‘simpler’ times. And you’ve reminded me I need to make some more pickled beans n corn. I enjoy reading the Foxfire books, I have one, bought at a yard sale. Would love to do a day trip sometime and visit the museum.
    You take care.

  • Reply
    Casey Devine
    February 18, 2012 at 7:02 am

    I treasure my Foxfire books from the 70s. Would love a subscription to the magazine!!

  • Reply
    Michele Langston
    February 18, 2012 at 12:17 am

    I would love this subscription. I have 3 Foxfire books so far and am trying to get the whole set.

  • Reply
    brenda s 'okie in colorado'
    February 17, 2012 at 11:59 pm

    I definitely will be buying the Foxfire books. I would love the magazine as well. Thank you for sharing all the old ways and stories.

  • Reply
    Gary Millwood
    February 17, 2012 at 11:14 pm

    Tipper, What a kind thought to offer the Firefox Magazine to one of your viewers! I was able to collect most of the Firefox series over the years and shared them with friends who expressed interest. People moved or lost some of the books and they were never replaced. I thought the Rayburn Gap School did a wonderful job of making history come alive by having the youth meet and interview the many folks who were so helpful in contributing to their project. The youth will never forget the opportunities they experienced. Affirmation of the folks who shared their stories and experiences certainly realized that they were people of worth! Thank You for your continued efforts to share information about our Appalachia!

  • Reply
    Darlene
    February 17, 2012 at 11:02 pm

    My Granny, Tisha Hughes, absolutely loved the FoxFire books. We bought each one as soon as they came out. She would share similar stories with me. One of my daughter’s teachers worked at Rabun school in the FoxFire program and she is named in at least one of the magazines that I bought at a used bookstore.

  • Reply
    Suzi Phillips
    February 17, 2012 at 10:27 pm

    Yes, please! Would love to be entered for the giveaway. I hope Teafortoo checks back-the verse for stopping bleeding is Ezekial Chapter 16 starting at verse 4. Verse 6 is supposed to be the most important one.

  • Reply
    barbara gantt
    February 17, 2012 at 8:43 pm

    Just talking about the Foxfire Books makes me homesick for NC mountains. I would love the magazine . Barbara

  • Reply
    Tipper
    February 17, 2012 at 12:18 pm

    Bev-thank you for the great comment! Since it may be a while before I get around to telling about Foxfire I will mention-the folks at Foxfire explain it very well on their home page. You can go here to see it:
    http://www.foxfire.org/index.html
    Blind Pig The Acorn
    Celebrating and Preserving the
    Culture of Appalachia
    http://www.blindpigandtheacorn.com

  • Reply
    lynn legge
    February 17, 2012 at 4:04 pm

    wow tipper what a generous give away.. i would love to be in the list for the magazine.. i so enjoy reading and can imagine all the many hours of reading of the traditions and words of the old families before us … thanks so much.. and as always.. i always enjoy your blog.. it always inspires and gives me many smiles.. tears.. etc..
    sending big hugs on this sunny friday
    lynn 🙂

  • Reply
    Bob Humphreys
    February 17, 2012 at 3:50 pm

    Hi Tipper,
    I read the foxfire books many years ago and learned so much. I had forgotten how enjoyable they were. thanks for reminding me about this great series of books.
    Bob

  • Reply
    Wanda Devers
    February 17, 2012 at 3:25 pm

    I love the Foxfire books and would really enjoy the magazine!

  • Reply
    BJ Anthony
    February 17, 2012 at 2:57 pm

    I have all the Foxfire books & just got the newest one. They are fantastic – true to life for my grand parents & great grands!I was not aware of the museum ( will catch it next trip) & magazine – would love to have a subscription!

  • Reply
    Rechelle
    February 17, 2012 at 2:49 pm

    I’m just tickled that my kids at 20 and 25 want to learn self sufficiency and are fascinated with the old ways of living and doing things- it makes me proud and happy-
    and this is a great giveaway!

  • Reply
    Tom
    February 17, 2012 at 2:46 pm

    I think it’s great that you shared the jar with your co-worker for her son. The best part of this is that you shared the Deer Hunter’s recipe with her. That was the best way to insure that important Appalchian ways go on. Thanks again for sharing the Foxfire website with us, I am hooked and have spent quite a bit of time visiting it. It certainly is a treasure!

  • Reply
    Tipper
    February 17, 2012 at 8:49 am

    Bill-I’m sorry I should have linked to the recipe-I did go back and add the link now-but here it is:
    https://blindpigandtheacorn.com/pickled-beans-and-corn-the-old-time-way/

  • Reply
    Ethel
    February 17, 2012 at 1:01 pm

    The old ways will go on, as long as there’s one Appalachian left! We all carry some of the old ways forward through the generations. As a Grandma I feel strongly about passing these things on, and you’re a great help in that Tipper!

  • Reply
    Judith
    February 17, 2012 at 1:01 pm

    Hi Tipper!
    I remember when the first Foxfire book was published. I read it from front to back. I remember people finding fault with the use of that book as a project for high school students. How stupid is that? It is my hope that the “old ways” will always be remembered and possibly used. We are so spoiled to modern conveniences(couldn’t have sent you an email 100 years ago), that we fail to see the true genius of the old traditions. I doubt most people could survive if all of our modern machines etc were to suddenly go away. May the good people of Foxfire keep on keeping on.

  • Reply
    B. Ruth
    February 17, 2012 at 12:59 pm

    Tipper,
    Thank you Tipper, I do know what Foxfire is…LOL. What I was meaning was I thought I saw it here on our place…not in the mountains…I’ve heard about it all my life sittin’ in on the tales of the tarheel hunters, etc..It had been raining and was very damp and warm…We came in from a very late trip from NC and SC from an antiquing jaunt”…LOL Sooo, I was very tired, and it was a very dark night and I was barely just making it from the driveway into the house. I guess I was thinking I wished I was still in the mountains…LOL That is when my eyes shown me a vision of sorts, Foxfire, I thought…LOL…but I was wrong of course…Thanks, B Ruth

  • Reply
    Carol Isler
    February 17, 2012 at 12:12 pm

    Oh, I smell a road trip in the making. I had no idea there was a museum. I’ve loved the Foxfire books because they are generated from where Momma’s momma’s people are from, just north of Taccoa, Ga. I believe I will keep the grandbaby busy when her spring break rolls around. Thanks for the info!
    Just recently we have discussed how we younger generations (LOL on me, I’m a granny) are keeping some of the old ways alive like soapmaking and beekeeping. I’ll be teaching these to the grandbaby when she is at our place. I just bought her a kid sized bee hat with veil.
    I think the old way can be good science fair project fodder, too.
    Carol

  • Reply
    Ron Banks
    February 17, 2012 at 12:06 pm

    Tipper, I at one time had the complete set of Foxfire books but loaned them to someone and then lost contact with them along with my books! I enjoyed them a lot. I would love to have their magazine and hope to replace the books at some point.
    Thanks,
    Ron

  • Reply
    tea4too0
    February 17, 2012 at 12:04 pm

    It has been awhile since I have read the Fox Fire books. I need to find them and glean more from them. One story has stuck with me tho. It was the one that told the bible verse people with the gift of healing used to stop bleeding. My geat grandmother had that gift. Unfortunatly I have lost the verse.
    Thank you for bringing back memories that I should be remembering everyday. Please enter me in your contest.

  • Reply
    B. Ruth
    February 17, 2012 at 11:34 am

    Tipper,
    and Jim…I thought I was seeing foxfire from a distance…but it wasn’t, it was just a small low gathering of …..? I will explain more when Tipper explains foxfire to her readers….LOL
    Tipper, I believe that folks will always cherish the Appalachian ways of the past…maybe with some new twists in quilting, basket making, chair making, canning, cooking, “puttin’ away” in the cold cellar. lol
    I think people long for the mountains and a space in time for the ways of their fathers/mothers and grandfathers/grandmothers. I am already telling tales of the times we kept chickens, rabbits, goats here on our 28 acres, just 3 miles from town…and when we gathered our organic eggs and put the roosters in freezer, etc..
    Gardening by the signs and some old tricks used for generations of gardening, excites our kids to the point of trying small raised beds, in their neighborhood in the city…So life goes on and children and grandchildren yearn to know their past and how their grandparents lived…In our case, as many in this area, we are Appalachian.
    Though we worked outside the home and did not depend totally on our own “handed down” resources we still retained a lot of our past heritage from the stories and ways of our grandparents….
    Thanks Tipper for the great post…

  • Reply
    Charlotte Woody
    February 17, 2012 at 11:26 am

    I’ve always loved the Foxfire books. Just recently I went back through some of the old volumes to document an answer to some
    younger folks about the expression “Christmas Gift.” I haven’t been in the area where the books are written in many years, but your information about the museum makes me want to plan a trip in that direction. I really enjoy your postings; and have connected with a lot of the traditions in one way or another.

  • Reply
    Richard Moore
    February 17, 2012 at 11:19 am

    Tipper, I hope your posts gains many new readers for the magazine. I didn’t think it was still publishing until you gave us the guided tour yesterday. Don’t consider me for the free subscription as I have subscribed directly and ordered some of their back issues.

  • Reply
    georgie
    February 17, 2012 at 11:06 am

    Oh that would be so nice! Have never read any of the Foxfire books but always wanting to learn how to do things.

  • Reply
    Kimberly
    February 17, 2012 at 11:04 am

    That is so cool! I had no idea that there was a Foxfire magazine!

  • Reply
    Dale Anderson
    February 17, 2012 at 11:00 am

    Was introduced to Foxfire Books by my Mother who gave me the early editions and I have purchased more. Refer to them often.

  • Reply
    Judith Curry
    February 17, 2012 at 10:56 am

    Thanks for reminding us about Fox Fire books and all those wonderful people like Aunt Arie. I like others did not know Fox Fire was active or had a magazine. I grew up with alot of old folks who could do all kinds of wonderful things that are lost to us today in our quest for more stuff. We need to pass along these skills it could become necessary for survival.Judth

  • Reply
    Ken
    February 17, 2012 at 10:54 am

    Tipper,
    I’m not familiar with the Foxfire
    book series, but I do love and
    appreciate the ways of old. I still have a quart of your’s and
    the Deer Hunters’ pickled corn and
    beans. I keep them to show folks
    how things use to be done, and to
    prove the ways of Appalachia are
    alive and well…Ken

  • Reply
    Gary Powell
    February 17, 2012 at 10:41 am

    Have several of the Foxfire books, but did not know about the magazine. Will have to schedule some time to visit the museum. I wish I had the old sled that Grandaddy used on his farm.

  • Reply
    Carolyn
    February 17, 2012 at 10:30 am

    Hi Tipper
    Thanks for bringing Foxfire back to light. I , like you did’t realize they were still going strong. My old books are well used and my darling GC have taken an interest in them.
    They have so much wonderful info in them to live your life by. I am so excited I will get to visit the wonderful Appalacian area this coing fall. I would love to win a subsription to their magazine.
    Thanks again for renewing an old interest
    Carolyn

  • Reply
    Dee Dee Parker
    February 17, 2012 at 10:22 am

    Thanks for the post about the museum. I am collecting the Foxfire books and would love to win the subscription to the magazine.

  • Reply
    Steve
    February 17, 2012 at 10:19 am

    My mother had all these books but I didn’t appreciate them at the time. I guess everything old becomes new again…now I wish I had them.

  • Reply
    Lanie
    February 17, 2012 at 10:14 am

    I love the books! I’m reading one right now!

  • Reply
    Garland Davis
    February 17, 2012 at 10:08 am

    I served aboard a ship in the Pacific many years ago that had a number of the Foxfire Books and Magazines in the ship’s library. I don’t know if they had been put there by an individual or if the Washington office that distributed books and periodicals to the ships had sent them.

  • Reply
    Rick Kratzke
    February 17, 2012 at 10:03 am

    Museums are always nice to visit cause they hold so much history that one can only be amazed.

  • Reply
    Mrs. K
    February 17, 2012 at 10:02 am

    Didn’t realize there was a Foxfire Magazine, but have read the books. I agree that there will always be elders to keep up and teach the old ways.

  • Reply
    Dan Myshrall
    February 17, 2012 at 10:02 am

    Hey Tipper,
    I remember hearing about Foxfire books from an old friend many years ago. I should really add them to my library. While I’m saving up the cash to buy them… I’d sure like to check out the magazine!
    P.S… Love your site!!

  • Reply
    Marylou Sweat
    February 17, 2012 at 9:45 am

    Tipper, We love out Foxfire books! We don’t refer to them like we used to. We need to get them back out again. My husband made a sled a few years ago using the picture in yesterday’s post as the pattern. It works just like it’s supposed to. Marylou Sweat

  • Reply
    amy jo phillips
    February 17, 2012 at 9:44 am

    I collect the books, when I travel I go to shops and thrieft store and look for them. Very good ifo!! I didnt know they had a mag!! I will have to check it out! Maybe one day I can visit the museum for myself!

  • Reply
    Karen Larsen
    February 17, 2012 at 9:41 am

    I’d love to be in the drawing for that magazine. I am so happy to hear that there will always be “old folks” to pass on the olde ways.

  • Reply
    Bill Burnett
    February 17, 2012 at 9:27 am

    I too love Foxfire Project, but like I stated yesterday I grew up doing things like they describe in the books. We like to think that we have so much more knowledge today than our ancestors possessed but in reflecting back just one generation I realize how talented my father was. His father was killed in a logging accident when Dad was five years old and he became “The man of the house” at a very young age. He was a machinest, knitter, plumber,carpenter, farmer, mechanic, beekeeper and was talented at pert near any other task needed to keep hearth & home going. I will never see the day that I will have the wide range of knowledge he and most of the other “Old Timers” possessed. I would be honored to win the subscription to the magazine. Keep sharing the knowledge of our ancestors.

  • Reply
    Thurmon Allen
    February 17, 2012 at 9:27 am

    I had not heard of the Foxfire books but will make it a point to find and read them thanks Tipper

  • Reply
    Sue Crane
    February 17, 2012 at 9:27 am

    I don’t have my Foxfire books anymore – I handed them along to our daughter, so I still have reading privileges 🙂 I never got to read any of the magazines though and always wanted to visit.

  • Reply
    Jen
    February 17, 2012 at 9:25 am

    This is such a wonderful treasure and a way to preserve part of our history. Thanks for the chance to win, Tipper

  • Reply
    kay dallas
    February 17, 2012 at 9:24 am

    actually my foxfire books are re-read every year. just finished aunt arie again. my mother made hog head cheese (?) just like aunt arie and yes i do remember plucking those eyes eek. most things i loved but not that. always loved “junk” that whats they called that stuff i found in the woods, dump, and side of the road. my poor kids would mutter please do not bring that home, please don’t stop. repeating either you love “antiques” “old stuff” “vintage” or not. you do not learn to love. today they follow my footsteps. my house and barns are a house of love. u r such an inspiration!

  • Reply
    Cheryl Soehl
    February 17, 2012 at 9:10 am

    I have that exact Foxfire book shown in your picture, but haven’t opened it in quite a while. You have inspired me. I think this weekend I will try to learn something old as something new to me. I may consult my 92 year old mother in law who has come to live near us — she still lives on her own, drives her car, and resists any attempt to slow her down. I think one thing that contributes to growing old well is having skills and using them, and then sharing them with those who want to learn.

  • Reply
    Osagebluffquilter
    February 17, 2012 at 9:05 am

    In the past two years since the blacksmith retired from his office job, we are trying to become so more living green. Canning, soap making, gardening, recycling and eating healthier is being tackled. I’d love a subscription to the magazine. Thank you for the link to purchase it!

  • Reply
    Rebecca Haughn
    February 17, 2012 at 9:00 am

    Am glad to keep the old ways going, have tried to teach my kids. Worldly they are right now. Hoping they return in time, if there is time to carry these tried and true ways forward. Thanks for the loving way you present your blog, it is a treasure and joy to read.

  • Reply
    Shirla
    February 17, 2012 at 9:00 am

    I have never heard of Foxfire books or magazines. I do plan to visit their website and check it out. I subscribe to The Kentucky Explorer magazine. You don’t have to be from KY to enjoy the wonderful magazine. It’s all about old recipes, pictures, stories and letters about the hard times and good old days.
    My mom used to make the best ‘mixed pickles’ using beans and corn.

  • Reply
    Jim Casada
    February 17, 2012 at 8:55 am

    Tipper—A number of folks have expressed an interest in reading the Foxfire books, wished they hadn’t loaned them (with books, the old chestnut about “neither a borrower or lender be” isn’t bad advice), or wondered about acquiring them. With a little browsing through Internet sources it is possible to find virtually all of them at quite reasonable prices. I won’t try to go into details, and it is possible, since I do a bit of peddling of out-of-print books, that I’m more familiar with how to find such things than most. Yet as you and anyone else who has had much dealings with me surely realizes, my computer skills are about as lacking as is humanly possible for someone actually using a computer. In other words, mine and ye shall find Foxfire (and unless I missed it and you’ve already explained, you need to tell everyone what foxfire is—I know but I’ll leave it to your fine blogging skills).
    Jim Casada
    http://www.jimcasadaoutdoors.com

  • Reply
    Uncle Al
    February 17, 2012 at 8:49 am

    I truly love sitting around a house with my aunts, uncles, Mama and others listening to them tell old stories, many of which are funny, but often they include a “did you know how we did that back then” or some such thing. I do so hope that there will always be “old folks” who are willing and able to pass along history.
    I’ve read some of the Foxfire things, but certainly not enough.
    Thanks for an interesting post. I live just a quick ride from the museum and definitely have to stop by soon.

  • Reply
    dolores barton
    February 17, 2012 at 8:34 am

    I agree with you – there will always be stories, and the thing is they will come when least expected. There are so many stories and legends that people are aware of, but they don’t always realize that their story would continue to add to the history of the area.

  • Reply
    Miss Cindy
    February 17, 2012 at 8:30 am

    Bradly, I’ve never seen or heard of black pickled beans,but I bet pickled beans could be made from any kind of bean. I’m sure folks used what ever kind of beans they had to pickle.
    I never heard of black beans till I was grown. Now they are available in almost every grocery store both dried and canned.
    Joyce is correct. There will always be old folks teaching younger folks their old ways. I predict that it will not be too many more generations till cooking will be what they are teaching. Seems like younger folks don’t know how to cook any more. Their lives are busy and all their food is in a bag handed through a drive thru window. lol
    Even in the grocery store more and more of their products are pre-cooked meals.
    Thanks to Joyce and the school for all they do to preserve the ways we love!

  • Reply
    LINDA L. KERLIN
    February 17, 2012 at 8:21 am

    I have truly loved the few foxfire books I have so I am sure a subscription to the magazine would prove just as interesting and perhaps teach me a few more olde fashioned ways that I an not aware of—so Tipper, please put me in for the give-away and Thanks—-I think the fact that you do these give aways is so wonderful and when you said you gave that woman a jar of your pickled beans and corn it made my heart smile for so many folks just think of $$$$ signs and never give from the heart- I used to be the only child at a great aunt and uncle christmas party that received a jar of he pickles while the others got a coloring book–and I so looked forward to that gift each and every year–and how I missed it when they pasted–and she too showed me how to make them but they were just not the same as that gift from the heart.

  • Reply
    Pat in east TN
    February 17, 2012 at 8:15 am

    I have the books handy and refer to them often. Great post Tipper. I’d love to win that subscription.

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    PinnacleCreek
    February 17, 2012 at 8:14 am

    Big mix of thoughts, but here goes. Never will I forget these Appalachian ways, and I do not want to! I am so thankful that you are passing a lot of this on to your children, and hopefully this wonderful culture will not be lost. Most of my family are just not interested. I do spark a little interest when I give them fresh vegetables from my garden. There is a wonderful place on I 77 in WV called Tamarack. It is filled with every type of craft made by WV artisans. Anybody have a good mixed pickle recipe? Much thanks to you, Tipper, and I love Jim Casada’s guest posts.

  • Reply
    Ethelene Dyer Jones
    February 17, 2012 at 8:09 am

    Whoever gets that Foxfire Magazine subscription as a give-away will get an enjoyable document. I used to subscribe, but let it lapse. Thanks for reminding us all of Foxfire and its continuing contributions to folklife preservation. (And we pickled corn and beans, too, at my house in Choestoe!)

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    Mike McLain
    February 17, 2012 at 8:09 am

    I remember seeing the Foxfire Books years ago. I am sorry now that I didn’t start collecting them.

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    tammy fletcher
    February 17, 2012 at 8:09 am

    Thanks for posting about the museum. I will stop by on my way home from the JCCFS class in March.

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    Bernadette B.
    February 17, 2012 at 8:07 am

    It does a person good to know that someone has enough love of their heritage to keep these books going over such a long period. We all have to only look back to our ancestors to find love and peace in each of ourselves.

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    John R
    February 17, 2012 at 8:05 am

    I remember coming home from college with a copy of the 1st volume that I had picked up on a trip to Mountain Home. I couldn’t wait to show it to my Granny. After she flipped through it a few minutes she said “th’ain’t nothin’ in there that ain’t common sense.” Then she said with a hurt look on her face, “If you really wanted to know all that stuff, why didn’t you ask me.” Talk about being crushed! But it did start a bond of sharing and conversation each time I visited. I just wish she had shared her yeast roll recipe.

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    Lise
    February 17, 2012 at 8:05 am

    My husband and I love old traditions so much we are planning on going to live at our cabin for a year and living off the land so to speak, to put all those old traditions into practice! I am really excited about it…of course, some traditions may be easier than others to implement successfully, but we will give it a go! Thanks for this post, would love your beans and corn recipe:)
    PS, planning on writing and blogging about the experience, can’t wait to share that link with you

  • Reply
    Madge @ The View From Right Here
    February 17, 2012 at 8:05 am

    Wish I lived close enough for a visit there and of course I could stop by and say hi at your place! Please enter me in your drawing..

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    Charles Fletcher
    February 17, 2012 at 8:01 am

    Tipper,
    I have read some of the Campfire bookslong time ago but not all that is out there. I guess you could classify come of the books I wrire in the Campfire class. Especially my second book–The Panther On Cold Mountain.
    Enjoyed your article.
    Charles Fletcher

  • Reply
    Bill Dotson
    February 17, 2012 at 7:59 am

    I have never heard of foxfire books but would like to have one. Tipper, is there a chance you could talk the Deer Hunter to sharing his recipe for his beans and corn?

  • Reply
    Michael Hopper
    February 17, 2012 at 7:31 am

    Great article, I found my Foxfire books from the 70s and am enjoying them again. Thanks for your posts.

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    Mary Shipman
    February 17, 2012 at 7:30 am

    LOL! How true, I am now ‘one of the older generation’ in this area. I have taught some of those younger ones, canning, gardening, wild plant lore, home remedies, and some hand crafts, quilting, knitting, crochet.
    Guess I just had to ‘see it said’ to make me realize it.
    I would love a subscription to the Foxfire Magazine, Tipper.

  • Reply
    kat
    February 17, 2012 at 7:18 am

    HAve never heard of the Foxfire books or musuem. Would love to take a trip someday to your area and visit. Next best thing would be to locate these books and read about it. Thanks for telling us about it. Always very interesting.

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    Marianne
    February 17, 2012 at 7:16 am

    I hope to visit the Fox Fire museum this spring, I grew up in southern Arkansas and my Uncle and his family made things and built things as he said the “old” way. When I discovered the Fox Fire books it was like my Uncle was telling me how to do things once again. Thanks for all that you do!

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    Sheryl Paul
    February 17, 2012 at 7:10 am

    They are fascinating books. I would love to learn more about preserving food or as I have heard it called “putting by”.

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    Tipper
    February 17, 2012 at 7:01 am

    Bradley-I have never heard of black pickled beans-it’ll be interesting to see if anyone else has : )
    Blind Pig The Acorn
    Celebrating and Preserving the
    Culture of Appalachia
    http://www.blindpigandtheacorn.com

  • Reply
    Donna W
    February 17, 2012 at 6:28 am

    I’d love to get that subscription. I’ve read all of the Foxfire books!

  • Reply
    Bradley
    February 17, 2012 at 6:05 am

    Tipper – There was a lady where I used to work was telling me about pickled beans. I had told that we never made them but, my Granny made the best I had ever tasted but when she died the receipe died with her. No one in the family could duplicate that taste her beans had. The woman I was talking with that day said that she knew a woman that made pickled beans that everybody was wild about. She also said rhat the first time she saw and tasted the beans she was surprised to see that they were virtually black in color. She said they were the best she’d ever had and she had eaten many. The problem was the woman wouldn’t tell anybody how to make them. Wonder if anybody has seen this type (black colored)? Maybe they are supposed to be black but, my Granny’s were green and they were the best I ever ate.

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    Ed Ammons
    February 17, 2012 at 5:42 am

    I remember an old saying” Those that can, do. Those that can’t, teach.” You are the antithesis of that. You are a can do teacher. You and your site here shows the world the Appalachian Spirit is alive and thriving. Keep it going! We’re behind you!

  • Reply
    Sandy kalvaitis
    February 17, 2012 at 5:31 am

    I used to have 5 of the Foxfire books and like a dummy I loaned them to a woman and she up and moved away taking my books with her. I still miss my books. Her not so much.

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