Appalachia Appalachian Food

Cushaw Soup

Cushaw soup

One of the recipes I’ve been using my abundance of cushaw squash in is Mark F. Sohn’s recipe for Squash and Potato Soup aka cushaw soup.

Cushaw Soup

  • 5 cups of peeled cubed cushaw or other winter squash
  • 1 medium potato-peeled and cubed
  • 1 1/2 cups water
  • 1 1/2 cups chicken stock
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1/3 cup heavy cream

Recipe for cushaw soup

 

Combine water and chicken stock. Place cushaw, potato, salt, and half of the broth water mixture into a sauce pot. Cook for about 45 minutes or until vegetables are cooked.

Lift squash and potato out and into a food processor to process until smooth. Or use a submersible blender if you have one and cream the mixture in the pot (that’s what I do). Or you could leave the soup alone and have a chunkier consistency.

With pureed soup back in pot-continue to cook-adding in reserved liquid to adjust the thickness of the soup to your liking. Once it’s too your liking-stir in the cream.

Best squash cushaw soup

 

This soup keeps very well in the frig-and is as good warmed up as it is when its first made. Thanks to Sow True Seed and their generosity with squash seeds-my freezer is full of cushaw squash-so I expect to make this soup often this winter.

Tipper

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11 Comments

  • Reply
    Magdalene Mwangi
    July 1, 2017 at 8:12 am

    yummy, recipe noted, thanks for sharing

  • Reply
    RB
    September 8, 2014 at 11:58 pm

    I LOVE soups, just about any kind, just about any time.
    Bro Tom, not so much and not at all in the heat of summer either. He’ll eat it, but he’ll always ask, “Where’s the meat?” if he’s not finding enough of it in his bowl. LOL
    God bless.
    RB
    <><

  • Reply
    Ken Roper
    September 8, 2014 at 1:37 pm

    Tipper,
    I’ve never tried cushaws but I make tater soup at home all the time. I use 3 medium potatoes peeled and cut into chunks, 1/2 an onion, some garlic flakes, black and red pepper, and salt. After this boils 20 to 30 minutes, use a potato masher to break it up some. Then add 2 slices of cheese, 1/2 small
    can of milk and some butter.
    Makes a nice snack with crumbled
    soda crackers to watch TV…Ken

  • Reply
    Deborah Ingram
    September 8, 2014 at 9:22 am

    Looks really good!

  • Reply
    Tipper
    September 8, 2014 at 9:22 am

    B-yes I don’t see why the seeds wouldn’t roast up the same. I havent tried roasting them yet-but I did save some for that very purpose : )
    Blind Pig The Acorn
    Celebrating and Preserving the
    Culture of Appalachia
    http://www.blindpigandtheacorn.com

  • Reply
    dolores
    September 8, 2014 at 9:13 am

    That’s a simple recipe. I’ve not eaten Cushaw, so I will look around for some.

  • Reply
    Ethelene Dyer Jones
    September 8, 2014 at 8:26 am

    The cushaw soup sounds wonderful! To my knowledge, I’ve never eaten any (and know I haven’t made any, even “back on the farm” when I was young and cooking for syrup-mill hands in the fall! Wish I had known then!). When I get a cushaw, I’ll try this! Have a beautiful fall, all you Blind Pig readers (and of course, the creator of this blog! She’s the greatest!)

  • Reply
    Miss Cindy
    September 8, 2014 at 7:43 am

    The soup does look and sound good. It’s interesting to me that there are no enhancements except salt. The flavors must be very good to stand alone without any spices.

  • Reply
    b. Ruth
    September 8, 2014 at 6:58 am

    Hey,
    Just one more thang! Do you think you could save and roast the Cushaw seeds like we roast Pumpkin seed. I think I will have buckets full of them, the squash got so big!
    Thanks Tipper,

  • Reply
    Tipper
    September 8, 2014 at 6:53 am

    B.-I’m positive the substitutions would work just fine!
    Blind Pig The Acorn
    Celebrating and Preserving the
    Culture of Appalachia
    http://www.blindpigandtheacorn.com

  • Reply
    b. Ruth
    September 8, 2014 at 6:48 am

    Tipper,
    That soup sure looks and sounds good. I wonder if you could just use a slant 1/3 cup of evaporated milk, and drop in with the milk a dollop of real butter, instead of the heavy cream. Otherwise, the cow is dry, and I will have to go to the store!
    I made potato soup last week with some of our new potatoes. I had cushaws ready then, but didn’t think of putting them in the soup. I try not to make a
    “warshtub full” of soup since it is just the two of us, but it is hard to do. Like most who have cooked for years, I don’t follow recipes for some soups, stews, dumplin’ stock, and chili’s, etc. Sooo, I end up with half of it in the freezer already made. Which can be a good thing maybe!
    Thanks Tipper,
    Enjoyed this recipe post,
    PS…I can’t wait for the Roast Pepper Soup…Some of my Smoky Marconi’s are still on the vine!
    I have put quite a few in the freezer nearly whole, in anticipation!

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