Coosa Flyer – A Book and a Giveaway

Coosa flyer written by wally avett

I’ve known who Wally Avett was as long as I can remember. I road the bus with 2 of his children all through high school. I knew Wally was a musician and I knew he used to work at the local paper, the Cherokee Scout. However, I did not know that Wally was writing and publishing fiction books until I ran into him a few years ago. Recently Wally brought me one of his latest books Coosa Flyer.

The book is based on the true historical story of Micajah Clark Dyer’s invention of a flying contraption. Dyer filed a patent for his invention  in 1874, a long time before the Wright Brothers took their first flight on the coast of NC.

I believe Wally was surprised that I already knew the story of Micajah Clark Dyer and his flying contraption. Blind Pig readers Ethelene Dyer Jones and son Keith Jones are direct descendants of Micajah Clark Dyer. Ethelene shared the fascinating story of her forefather’s flight with me a few years ago.

Coosa Flyer, has a factual newspaper column written by Wally himself at the beginning of the book. The article gives insight into Micajah Clark Dyer and his love of flight.

The fictional portion of the book quickly pulls you into the story of Jeremiah Hogan, better known as the Professor, and his desire to fly through the sky like a bird.

I enjoyed the book! I found it especially interesting to read about this area. Even though the book is fiction I still felt as though I had a glimpse into the past history of the area. I believe folks who have never even visited the area would also enjoy the book.

Want a chance to win a copy of Coosa Flyer? Leave a comment on this post. *Giveaway ends Saturday March 26.

If you’d like to pick up your own copy of the book check out Wally’s Amazon page here. Or if you are a local drop by the Cherokee Scout, the Highlander Art Gallery in downtown Murphy, the John C. Campbell Folk School Gift Shop, or the Cherokee County Historical Museum to pick up a copy.

To find out more about Wally and the other books he has published, visit his website. If you have access to the Cherokee Scout check out Wally’s Hillbilly Ranger column-it’s always a good read.

Tipper

 

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28 Comments

  • Reply
    Aquilla Yagoda
    March 25, 2016 at 12:55 pm

    I love history and this sound so exciting. I had never heard this story and want to know more. Thanks for sharing. I plan on researching today to learn more about Micajah.

  • Reply
    Patsy
    March 25, 2016 at 9:44 am

    I just got around to reading all my emails because I’ve been enjoying a visit with my 86 year old aunt. Hope I’m not to late for a chance at winning…I’m always interested in a good book! Happy Easter to you!

  • Reply
    b. Ruth
    March 24, 2016 at 10:02 pm

    Tipper,
    I would enjoy reading the book…I have flown a few times, but my Dad never did. He always said,
    “Give me a good walking stick anytime, I just as soon have my feet on the ground!” He also would go on to say that he weren’t in any hurry to get anywhere that an old Packard or walking stick couldn’t take him in time…Ha
    We just got in from Dollywood. Spring break for the grandchildren. We sure missed seeing Dolly, she had to cancel her parade appearance at 4;30PM due to the rain that moved in late this afternoon…
    Shucks….however we caught a couple of shows and the kids loved the rides…They were disappointed that the Lightning Rod…new wooden roller coaster didn’t get opened by their visit today…
    The rain on the raised beds today should help the growth of the seed/lettuce we planted yesterday…
    Thanks Tipper,

  • Reply
    Ed Ammons
    March 24, 2016 at 8:50 pm

    To be historically accurate the Wright Brothers were from Ohio and built their Flyer there. They took it to the Outer Banks of North Carolina to take advantage of the steady onshore winds that provided the lift to get the Flyer off the ground. Without the engine the machine would have flown much better.
    Just an aside, but my oldest grandson is at OBX with his school class right now. It’s not his first trip there though, his aunt Melanie used to live in Kitty Hawk and sold real estate there. He visited there several times a year.

  • Reply
    Jane Bolden
    March 24, 2016 at 8:20 pm

    Interesting! Would love to read the book. I’m going to google Micajah right now.

  • Reply
    Dolores
    March 24, 2016 at 8:12 pm

    I would love nothing more than to win a copy of Dyer’s book. I read Blind Pig every day; it’s my early cup of coffee. I also enjoy reading stories that take lace in NC and in th Applacian area. Your daily posts have taught me a lot. I’m keeping my fingers crossed.

  • Reply
    Gary Powell
    March 24, 2016 at 6:54 pm

    Book sounds very interesting. Would love to read it.

  • Reply
    Dorothy DeLong
    March 24, 2016 at 5:46 pm

    I enjoy the Blind Pig and The Acorn very much. Wish I had every one of them in print. I enjoy reading about the past history of different places. The book Coosa Flyer by Wally Avett sound very interesting. I would love to win a copy of his book! Please put my name in for the drawing.—Dorothy DeLong

  • Reply
    Richard Beauchamp
    March 24, 2016 at 4:15 pm

    would love to read the book, Please enter for the give away!

  • Reply
    Sherry
    March 24, 2016 at 2:59 pm

    Please put my name in the hat! I love to read and this one sounds like a winner.

  • Reply
    Jeanne
    March 24, 2016 at 2:40 pm

    What a great sounding book. I would love to read it and of course “win it”. I bought another book that you had written about and recommended, “The Body at Wrapp’s Mill”, by Celia Miles. The author had actually used a local historic mill, The Dellinger Mill on Cane Creek, as a part of her inspiration and education into grist mills and what a lovely scene for a murder. It was this book, the Blind Pig, the John Campbell School, the Biltmore and the Smokies that called be to visit Murphy and South Western North Carolina last October.
    I loved my time in your area of Appalachia. Have nothing but great memories and I would love to read this new book. The Blind Pig points me to many areas that enrich my life. Love the blog and love the people. Thanks, Tipper (and family) I look forward to your stories, pictures, information and thoughts every day.

  • Reply
    Ken Roper
    March 24, 2016 at 1:22 pm

    Tipper,
    When I called to request “Crazy Arms” by The Pressley Girls, Donna
    Lynn said, ” That was by Chitter and Chatter and they’ll be playing at Martin’s Creek Community Center on Saturday at 6:00.”
    …Ken

  • Reply
    Sue Crane
    March 24, 2016 at 12:25 pm

    Ahh, a new author to explore. I especially love reading about familiar, favorite areas.

  • Reply
    Ken Roper
    March 24, 2016 at 12:18 pm

    Tipper,
    Yesterday, I listened to the CD “Shepherd of My Soul” about all evening. It’s just Wonderful!
    I’m not much of a reader, by the time I read my favorite “Blind Pig and the Acorn, Reflections of Needmore, and Jim’s Newsletter, that’s about all for me. We got a lot of Good Writers around here.
    …Ken

  • Reply
    Garland Davis
    March 24, 2016 at 11:31 am

    Would Love to have the book by Wally!

  • Reply
    Tamela
    March 24, 2016 at 11:19 am

    I’d love to have a copy of the book. Seems like most families have ties with history if they’d just share their stories. That’s what is so fascinating about your blog – you keep history alive with family stories and with history in the making.
    For several years I had responsibility for my husband’s aunt and uncle; during that time I learned many things about them that the family never knew. They knew about his early venture into amateur radio – he was one of the first to get a ham radio license not only in the state of Texas, but in the country; and he taught his nephews morse code so they could communicate with the world. He had a commercial license as well, working on a maritime barge, on merchant marine ships, and on the first airlines including Braniff’s early flights out of Miami into Cuba. He also flew the South American flights (mostly centered in Lima, Peru with an airline called Panagra) and flew as the radio man and navigator on some experimental flights which included a crash landing on the Brazilian Coast with Howard Hughes. All survived but they were stuck there for about a week before rescue arrived. Apparently they had plenty of rum and thoroughly enjoyed their “vacation” – which is also why he and his wife were ostracized by the rest of their Baptist and Church of Christ families back in the 30s and early 40s.
    In the “amazing coincidence” category: when my husband and I moved to our current home and were making acquaintance with our neighbors, I noticed a Panagra sign hanging on the walls of our “next door” neighbor. Turns out, they knew and worked with husband’s aunt and uncle in Lima! The sad irony is that we had just buried uncle -he would have so loved to share stories with our neighbor.
    -sigh!- I know this isn’t Appalachian history – but thought some of your readers might be interested anyway. If you choose to eliminate these last ramblings, I understand.

  • Reply
    Kenneth Ryan
    March 24, 2016 at 11:01 am

    I would love to have Wally’s book. It sounds very interesting.

  • Reply
    Jeanie
    March 24, 2016 at 10:29 am

    It sounds like an amazing story. Obviously, Dyer’s name needs to become better known. What a pioneer! I’d love to read the story.

  • Reply
    colleen Holmes
    March 24, 2016 at 9:50 am

    Hmmm. Never heard of this author before.
    Love your blog. It’s my morning cup of coffee.

  • Reply
    Sheryl Paul
    March 24, 2016 at 8:56 am

    I always love a good story, even better if it is true. Storytellers like Wally have been such a great part of Appalachian heritage. I enjoyed the story.

  • Reply
    Sheryl Paul
    March 24, 2016 at 8:56 am

    I always love a good story, even better if it is true. Storytellers like Wally have been such a great part of Appalachian heritage. I enjoyed the story.

  • Reply
    Sheryl Paul
    March 24, 2016 at 8:56 am

    I always love a good story, even better if it is true. Storytellers like Wally have been such a great part of Appalachian heritage. I enjoyed the story.

  • Reply
    Sheryl Paul
    March 24, 2016 at 8:56 am

    I always love a good story, even better if it is true. Storytellers like Wally have been such a great part of Appalachian heritage. I enjoyed the story.

  • Reply
    Eva Nell Mull Wike, PhD
    March 24, 2016 at 8:55 am

    Yeah! PLEASE PUT MY NAME IN the drawing for the prize. Eva Nell

  • Reply
    Miss Cindy
    March 24, 2016 at 8:24 am

    That’s pretty cool. We were all taught that the Wright brothers were the first to fly, but they weren’t. Wonder how much else we were taught that was wrong!

  • Reply
    wayne smith
    March 24, 2016 at 7:38 am

    “coosa flyer” sounds interesting. when i was very young i thought i could fly if i could just get off the ground. of course i never did, but i had a few bumps trying. i guess most very young boys think about doing things like that. i do love your beautiful area of this great country.

  • Reply
    Darlene Debty Kimsey
    March 24, 2016 at 7:19 am

    Heck, yeah!! I want to win a book by Wally Avett! 😀

  • Reply
    Mike McLain
    March 24, 2016 at 7:18 am

    I spent 35 years working in the aviation industry. It amazes me the strides that have been made in just over a hundred years, but it really amazes me that I have never heard of Micajah Clark Dyer! I have to do some research now to get myself up to speed.

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